(S & T) Biographies


Sanders, Jesse "Jack"

Sanders, Wayne E.

Samuel, James T.

Saindon, Gordon

Saunders, David M.

Scherbon, William V.

Schnauffer, Pat

Schuster, Fred

Seeds, Richard G.

Semmes, Raphael Jr

Sheets, James R.

Simard, Joseph T.

Spaulding, Bill.

Speary Norwood L.

Sperry, James G.

Stanfill, George A.

Stein, Richard B.

Steyne, J.E. (Gene)

Strickland, Robert J.

Sullivan, Donald E.

Sutton, George E.

Swainbank, John A.

Sylvain, Robert N.

Szczepanski, Kazimier Z.

Tabor, Nolan "Pete"

Tewers, Ronald G.

Trimble, Arthur L.

Trybala, Edward

Turner D.J. "Duke"

 

 

Capt James R. Sheets

TOPSHAM — Captain James Robert (Bob) Sheets passed away May 22, 2006, at home on Abenaki Drive, with his family and friends by his side. He had been battling the effects of pulmonary fibrosis for many years.

He was born in Akron, Ohio, the son of Loren K. and Margie Allen Sheets.

He was educated in West Virginia schools and graduated from Morris Harvey College (University of Charleston) in 1954. He was a member of Kappa Sigma Kappa Fraternity.

He married Joan Mendel, and they celebrated their 51st anniversary in October.

He received his commission in the Navy in 1954 and served on a coastal mine-sweeper before going to flight training in Pensacola. He was then assigned to VP23 from 1958 to 1962. After two years at the Naval Security Station in Washington, D.C., he reported to VP21 as maintenance officer.

He was selected to go to the Naval War College in Newport, R.I., in the Command and Staff College then reported to Commander Fleet Air Keflavik, Iceland, where he was instrumental in setting up the first Tactical Support Center. In conjunction with this job, he traveled to Scotland, England and Norway as part of NATO. Much to his delight, he was selected to Command VP10 where he deployed to Bermuda, the Azores and Spain.

The next four years found the family in Naples, Italy, where he was on the MARAIRMED staff and then on the NATO staff as "The Number Two Turk" to a Turkish admiral. It was in Naples that he was selected to the rank of captain and ordered to the Naval War College as president of the senior course.

The Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, Pa., was his next assignment as chief of staff. Crystal City, Va., then became his office as fire and safety officer for the Navy, and from there he retired.

He enjoyed hunting, fishing, reloading for his friends, teaching hunter safety and being with his family and friends. He was a lifetime member of NRA and the Lisbon Fish and Game Association. Bob was a member of Ashla Lodge Masons in Auburn. He was a loving, supportive husband, father and grandfather.

He is survived by his wife, Joan; daughters, Teri Griffin of Rathdrum, Idaho, Brigitte Moler of Topsham, Karen Moody of Harpswell; and one son, Brian Sheets of Portland; six grandsons, one granddaughter and one great-grandson.

Memorial services were held at West Harpswell Baptist Church on Route 123 on May 30 at 7 p.m.

 

 Nolan Tabor, AXC, 63-66

Norfolk - Nolan (Pete) Tabor of Elizabeth Avenue in Norfolk passed away in his home on January 22, 2006. He was born in Witchita, Kansas in 1930 and graduated from Belle Plain High School in 1948. Nolan retired as a Chief Petty Officer from the U.S. Navy in 1971 after 20 years of active duty and relocated with his family to Norfolk. Nolan served in Patrol Squadron VP-21 from 1963 to 1966. He was a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam Wars and the Cuban Missile Crisis. He was a member of the Fleet Reserve Association.  Nolan’s greatest pride was his family. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Kathryn (Kay) Tabor, their 6 children, 14 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren. His children and their spouses include: George and Rhonda Tabor Glazner of Chesapeake; Steve and Tina Tabor Boyle of St Charles, Missouri; Carl and Alice Ann Tabor Sabatini of Bristow, Virginia; Bennett (Ben) and Cari Tabor of Poquoson; Carter and Jeanne Tabor Barnard of Portsmouth; and Jeff and Nola Tabor Sawyer of Virginia Beach. Grandchildren include: Suzanne Glazner Prather of Lighthouse Point, Florida; Andrew Glazner of Chesapeake; Timothy (Timmy) Glazner of Chesapeake; Laural Cleary of Norfolk, Alex and Megan Boyle of St. Charles, Missouri; Michael Sabatini (deceased), Caroline and Christopher Sabatini of Bristow, Virginia; Heather and Joel Tabor of Poquoson; Chase and Maddy Barnard of Portsmouth; and Kayla and Julia Sawyer of Virginia Beach. Great-grandchildren include: Ethan and Matheson (Matt) Prather of Lighthouse Point, Florida; and Rylan and Delanie

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Joseph T. Simard, ADC, USN, VP-21 57-60


BRUNSWICK - Joseph T. Simard, 92, of Brunswick passed away peacefully on June 25, 2005 in the comfort of his home after a long and eventful life.

Born in Manchester, N.H. to a family of 12 children in 1913, he was the son of Henry L. and Anna M. Danielson Simard. His family settled in the Lynn, MA, area. Joe began a career in the Navy in 1934 as a young man, and his assignments over the years took him all over the world. His journey provided him with an education learned through living, and although he did not have the luxury of formal education Joe was fluent in three languages, and stressed the value of education to his family.

He was witness and participant to the evolution of the flying Navy. Joe retired from active duty in 1961 at Brunswick Naval Air Station as Chief Petty Officer who had a distinguished record with both the patrol squadrons and the shore patrol.

After his Navy retirement, Joe managed the Officer's Club at BNAS, managed the stock and warehouse at the WT Grant's at Cook's Corner, and eventually turned his long-time coin collecting hobby into his retirement business, the Coin and Stamp Corner in the old Grand City store.

Joe was a long time resident of Brunswick after orders assigning him to BNAS brought him to the area in the early 1950's. He married Viola L. Smith who predeceased him in 1983. Together they raised a family that included 9 children, and today the Simard name is well recognized in the Mid-Coast region as a result of the growing family tree.

Joe was a devout Catholic and an active member of St. John's Church. Many of his children and some of his grandchildren attended St. John's School. Joe was an engaging man who enjoyed bowling in leagues and with his family well into his eighties. Family bowling is a tradition with the Simard family still today. He also enjoyed teaching what he knew about his hobbies and interests to his children and grandchildren. Perhaps his greatest passion was for hunting and fishing and the camaraderie that developed with his hunting camp and fishing trip buddies. He began heading off to the north Maine woods for fall and spring sojourns while horses were still used to hauling wood and the roads were few and far between. He was well known in the Alagash watershed and was a friend to many of the woodcutters there. Joe was fond of leisure travel as well and in his recent past was accompanied by his companion Germaine on excursions to Europe and across the USA.

Surviving are siblings, Norman Simard of Florida, Lorenzo Simard of Lynn, MA, Robert Simard of Florida, Cecille Branscom of Lynn, MA, and Wilfred Simard of Lynn, MA.

Surviving children include, Geraldine Shastid of Amarillo, TX, Joseph T. Simard, Jr. and his wife, Robin of Charlottesville, VA, Norman C. Simard of Indianapolis, IN., Roland F. Simard and his wife, Deborah of Bath, Richard R. Simard and his wife, Holly of Freeport, Gregory J. Simard and his wife, Brigitte of Brunswick, Suzanne E. Poliquin of Manchester, NH.

Deceased children are Mary M. Strahl who died in 1987 and Robert E. Simard who died in 1973, a brother and five sisters. He is also survived by his fiancé, Germaine Bois of Brunswick, many, many nieces, nephews, grandchildren and great grandchildren.

Friends may visit from 2-4 and 6-8 P.M., Thursday, June 30, 2005 at Brackett Funeral Home, 29 Federal Street, Brunswick, Maine. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held 11 A.M., Friday, July 1, 2005 at St. John the Baptist Church, 39 Pleasant Street, Brunswick with the Rev. Michael McGarrigle officiating. Interment with military honors will be held at St. John's Cemetery, Brunswick.

In Joe's memory memorial contributions may be made to St. John the Baptist Church, 39 Pleasant Street, Brunswick, Maine 04011.

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 David M. Saunders

David McKeon Saunders, a career naval officer who was also an avid yachtsman and aviator, died Wednesday (6/16/2004) from complications of a stroke at his home in Annapolis. He was 83.

Mr. Saunders, who was born and raised in Washington, DC, moved with his family to Takoma Park in the early 1940's. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1944 with the class of 1945, which was accelerated because of the need for officers during World War II.

After graduation, he served aboard the light cruiser USS Miami in the Pacific, and after graduating from flight school at Pensacola, FL, he flew as a Naval Aviator during the last year of the war.

In 1951 he attended the Naval Post Graduate School and was awarded a Gugenheim Fellowship to pursue jet propulsion studies at Princeton University, While at Princeton, where he earned a masters degree in science and engineering in 1952, he served as a jet engine consultant and project manager for Pratt & Whitney.

After leaving Princeton he was assigned to the Navy's VP-21, its first propeller-jet mine laying squadron.

He attended the U.S. Naval War College in the early 1960's before being named director of program evaluation for the Navy's ASW Systems Project in Washington.

At the time of his retirement in 1968, Mr. Saunders had served a tour of duty in Vietnam as captain of the USS Chara, an ammunition carrier. After retiring, he moved to Annapolis where he established S&R Associates Inc., which specializes in real estate development, construction and restoration of old homes. He was president of the business, which is still family-owned and operated. He also sold airport ground support equipment, including firetrucks and other firefighting equipment.

Until giving up the sport in 1992, Mr. Saunders enjoyed flying his Cessna 340 twin engine aircraft. An accomplished yachtsman, Mr. Saunders successfully competed aboard his two sloops, the Spindrift, and the Air Mail, in 19 ocean races, winning trophies in the Bermuda Race, and Southern Ocean Racing Conference. He also won six high point championships in the Chesapeake Bay, including the prestigious Viking Trophy.

David was married to for 46 years to the former Elizabeth Rosasco. She died in 1993.

Memorial services were held at the Naval Academy Chapel on Wednesday, 23 June 2004.

David is survived by his wife of eight years, the former Carol Hoke; three sons, Mark P. Saunders of Yorktown, VA, and Scott F. Saunders and Craig W. Saunders, both of Annapolis; and four grandchildren.

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 Jesse 'Jack' Sanders

Annapolis, 1942
Auburn, 1981

(This obituary from the Auburn Evening Star)

Jesse 'Jack' Sanders, 85, died Thursday, October 31, 2002, at 2:30 a.m., at the Laurel of DeKalb nursing home in Butler, Indiana.

Jack was born 17 April 1917, in Nashville, Tenn., to Dr. Jesse A. Sanders and Mary B. (Bright) Sanders. He married Helen J. Blevins on 25 July 1953, in Connorsville, Indiana. Helen survives.

Jack served as mayor of Auburn, Indiana, from 1976 to 1984. He graduated from Auburn High School in 1934 where he was the senior class president, and then graduated from Indiana University in 1938.

Jack served in the U.S. Navy during WWII from 1942 to 1946. Initially assigned to the USS Maryland, he went on to pilot PB4Y "Liberators" in the South Pacific. Among other awards, Jack was a recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross. He retired after 26 years in the USNR.

Jack was a golf professional at Greenhurst Country Club in Auburn and the owner of the Auburn Recreation Center bowling alley. He served as director of the Peoples Bancorp.

Jack was a member of St. Mark's Lutheran Church in Auburn, the Youth for Christ golf benefit committee, Greenhurst Country Club, Sugar Mill Country Club, the Masonic Temple, Mizpah Flying Shriners, Cedar Creek Shrine Club, Auburn Lions Club, Loyal Order of Moose, Elks Club, Elks National Bowling Association, the American Legion, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Phi Kappa Psi, and the Indiana University Intrafraternity Council.

He served on the Auburn Board of Zoning Appeals, the Auburn Planning Commission, United Fund of DeKalb County, and the DeKalb County Democratic Central Committee.

Also surviving are two daughters and sons-in-law, Jeri and Herb Hillabrand of Wheaton, Illinois, and Terry and Scott Swim of Indianapolis; a son and daughter-in-law, Jeff and Robin Sanders of Zionsville,; and seven grandchildren, Chelsea and Alex Hillabrand, Justin, Jennifer, Jessica, and Joseph Swim and Peter Sanders.

Jack was preceded in death by two sisters, Barbara Oren and Virginia Croxton.

Services were held in St. Marks Lutheran Church of Auburn. The Rev. Ken Conrad and the Rev. Stephen K. Kummernus officiated. Burial was in Woodlawn cemetery.

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 Jack Standfill

1938-2002
1958, VP-21 years
1969, 'Chief' Standfill
1985, Milpitas/ LMSC years
2001 VP-21 Reunion

George Alvin Standfill Sr. died 19 August, 2002 at 64 years of age. He was a resident of Milpitas, California for 36 years. "Jack" was born in Tichnor, Arkansas on 19 June, 1938. He served in the U.S. Navy for twenty years, retiring as an AWC in 1975. Jack then worked for Lockheed Missles and Space Company for 21 years as a Group Test Engineer and retired from there in 1996.

Jack is survived by his wife Pearl who he met in Brunswick, Maine while stationed at BNAS, and married in March of 1958 at Auburn, Maine, and his children; son George Jr. and daughter-in-law Caroline; son Scott L. and daughter-in-law Kristi; daughter Stacy and son-in-law Kenneth Garcia; and former daughter-in-law Lori Standfill. Jack is also survived by his grandchildren Kimberly, Travis, and Brittany Standfill, and Nicholas and Kaitlyn Garcia.

Jack enjoyed camping and fishing and was involved with the Boy Scouts of America and Police Activities League Soccer. Jack also enjoyed woodworking, reading, his computer, watching tv football, baseball, and golf. Jack also became a golfer after his retirement from Lockheed, and was particulaqrly fond of Starbucks coffee. But mostly, Jack enjoyed spending his time with his family.

Jack is described as having been a quiet, simple person, whom everyone liked. He was also described as being of strong character and battled his lung cancer to the end. Jack will forever be loved in the hearts of his family, and respected by his Navy shipmates. Jack Standfill is, and will be missed.

Private services were held with the assistance of the Neptune Society. Jack is also remebered in the Navy Log.
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 George E. Sutton

I came to VP-21 after recall in error on September 1, 1952. Lcdrs. were not supposed to be called, but my promotion hadn't made the fifty feet between the offices involved, so my orders read Lt.

I was born in WV, made it through two years at Marshall College (now Marshall State University) before deciding that we were going to war, so enlisted in the RCAF and served until January 1943, when I transferred to the U.S. Navy as an Ensign AV(T), and was sent back to Corpus Christi, to basic training. What a transition! From the Bristol Beaufighter to the Vultee ''Vibrator'', SNV, was a bit painful.

Then to Instrument training in SNJ's followed by Advanced Training in PBY's.
I had no idea that AV(T) was the code for the civilian pilots commissioned into the Naval Reserve, so was surprised when I was sent to VRF-I, first to ferry N2S, Stearman trainers. Another traumatic transition, from a semi-truck to a sports car! I narrowly avoided a crash, and then learned to fly that and most of the Navy single engine planes of the time. I did later get to fly the PV-I and the PBY and then, on loan to a VRS, the Lockheed Lodestar.

When they cut me loose in January 1946, I went back to WVU for a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, completed in January 1948. From there to work for a company that designed and built coal handling installations. The coal strike of that year put me out of a job, so I moved to the University of Florida as a research engineer.

I still wanted to fly, but couldn't afford civilian rates, so joined the Reserves at NAS Jacksonville, from a VPS squadron, later to a VP squadron. So, in 1952, one month after finishing my Master's degree, I reported to active duty. After a period of "retraining'' I was assigned to VP-21 only to find that the officers were predominantly regulars. Lcdr. David (?) Maxwell, Lt. Wallace Amling and I were the only Reserves other than the Ensigns, to my best memory. The general attitude seemed to be that we were unnecessary nuisances, and to be tolerated, if not welcomed.
I loved the P4M, as one of the best I ever flew, both from a pilot's view and an operating view. I had just made PP1P (meaning I could fly in command, but not in combat) when we found ourselves in a dog called the P2V-6. I flew co-pilot to Lcdr. Ed Hufstedler, LtJG Dale Walsh, Cdr. Dan Ettinger. They would not honor my Reserve PPC until they realized Ed Hufstedler was being transferred out, and they had one more plane than PPC's, so I was requalified and a crew was assigned. It ultimately shook down, with Wally Amling and Bob Wolen as the pilot/navigation crew and ''Willy'' Williams as Plane Captain. I cannot find the list of the crew and my Octogenarian memory refuses to recall all the names. When Wally got out, back to United Airlines, Bill Gerber moved in and rode out the rest of the time.

I recently said to a young friend, an airline pilot, previously P3 commander, that I was a good Naval Aviator, but not a good Naval Officer. He felt the same way. Just as the USN's had some suspicion of us, we did of them as well. As an engineer, I had little interest in history and/or tradition, but preferred logic in decision making. As a result, when I was about to be released, a scathing fitness report insured that I would never be able to expand the center stripe.
I was CO of a Reserve Patrol squadron when passed over the first time, along with three other CO's at Grosse Ile. What mystery! After that much time, it made sense to try to complete twenty, so I found whatever billets were available, until it was obvious that promotion was not possible. Then I switched to CEC only to find that I still had no chance for promotion. After two years active reserve in that category, I applied for non-pay retirement, which switched to pay status after age 60.

I stayed in Engineering Education serving at UF, Michigan State, Arizona, Arizona State Nevada, until going to the National Council of Engineering Examiners as Director of Professional Services (mostly the National Exams) for two years. Then, for eighteen years, I served as Dean of the School of Engineering at Youngstown State University, now retired.

My wife, Marilyn, has given me two fine Sons. The Reverend Dana Sutton is a Presbyterian Minister, with two sons, and Jeremy is a teacher and practitioner of a structural integration process called golfing, still unmarried.

I look back on my military career with both joy and sorrow. I'm not sure I liked either of the Military Services, but did like a lot of the people with whom I served, and enjoyed both flying and engineering in the service.
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 Fred Schuster

                           
VP-21, 1953

                           
Aboard HC-2, 1954


Born: 14 June 1930
Joined Navy: 18 Feb. 1951
Attended Elecronics "A" School Memphis Tenn 1951-1952
Joined VP21 June 1952
Assigned Crew HC2 May 1953 Stayed on Crew 2 until discharge Feb. 1955
Worked MacDonnel Aircraft 2 years as Flight Test Instrumention Tech. 1955-1957
Worked a chemical company 37 Years 1957-1994. Company produced iron oxide of various shades for use in construction and paint industries for color. Also magnetic iron oxide for video, audio and computer tape manufacturers.
Various Positions: Reasearch Investigator (Magnetic Iron Oxide), Quality Assurance Labortory (Magnetic Iron Oxide) Manger, Tech. Service (Magnetic Iron Oxide), Electron Microscope work Magnetics), Computer Programer Quality Assurance.
Now retired and enjoying life.

Fred is also the 2001 - 2003 Historian for the VP-21/ VPB-111 Veterans Association.
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 John E. Steyne 'Gene'


Originally from eastern Iowa. I lived in several cities in that area until entry into the military, my first association was USNR in 1957 and went as follows:

Feb 1957 - Jan 1958
NR Surface Division 953, Cedar Rapids, IA - with a trip to RTC Great Lakes IL in Dec 1957.

Jan 1958 - Sep 1958
Enlisted in the USN and went to RTC San Diego, then to NATTC Norman, OK (basic aviation training) and on to NATTC Memphis to AMH'A' school.

Oct 1958 - Sep 1959
NATTC Norman, OK, first real duty. Assigned to Operations Maintenance. (NATTC Norman closed in Nov 1959)

Sep 1959 - Dec 1960
ATU-501/VT-29 NAS Corpus Christi, TX. Corrosion control on P2V-3/4/6, P5M-1, and R4D-5/C-117D. Advanced to AMH2 just before departing.

Jan 1961 - Mar 1964
VP-30 NAS Jacksonville (Jan-Mar 1961) for P2V FRAMP.

On to VP-21 at NAS Brunswick and the P2V-7(SP-2H) assigned. Shortly after arrival I was assigned to CAC-3 as #2 Ord and crew metalsmith/ 3rd. wiper. CAC-3 had Buno 141242 for most of my tour with the following folks (as I recall) on the crew :

VP-21 Crew-3(LH-3) 1961-1964

PPC LTjg Thomas Betterton LT 'Charlie' Brown
CP LTjg Dalton LTjg M H Lewis
CP/Nav LTjg Robert C. Rohr LCdr J J Rollins
TACO LTjg William C. Ellis [NFO]

PC ADR2 Norman Stafford (Norm) ADR2 O.E. McErwin (Gene)
2nd Mech ADR2 Larry S. Jackson ADR3 Donald Fogle (Don)
Ord AO1 Lionel C. Banda (LC) AO3 Lynn Wall
2nd Ord AMH2 John E. Steyne (Gene)
1st Tech AT1 Clifford D. Morningstar (Cliff) AX2 Frank Fredella(Fred)
2nd Tech AT2 Lester Stotler (Les)
3nd Tech AT3 Andrew Przenkop (Andy)
Elec AE1 Warren C. Massey

LTjg's Betterton, Dalton, Rhor all made LT in late 1962/early 1963. When LT Betterton departed VP-21 in 1963 the PPC slot was passed to LT (soon to be LCdr) 'Charlie' Brown. On LT Dalton departing the squadron LT Rohr got sole custody of the 'right seat' leaving now LT Ellis in the back as TACO/ Nav, then LTjg Mike Lewis arrived.
AO1 Banda finally made AOC and was re-assigned to the 'AO' shop with crew duties on 'Crew-14', AO3 Wall assumed Banda's aft-station seat. AE1 Massey was promoted to AEC but remained on the crew. ADR2 Stafford PCS'ed and ADR2 McErwin became the head wiper. ADR2 Jackson was later moved to another crew and young ADR3 Fogle got the 2nd Mech spot. AT2 Stotler opted for civilian life and AX2 Fredella got his seat on the flight deck.

The first deployment for me was to Argentia (1961) with side trips to Keflavik. We also went north with a 'weather guesser' aboard to plot the ice flow into the North Atlantic. Then came the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), we were scattered all over!! CAC-3 spent time in Key West, the Azores, Keflavik, and all points between. Next came Sigonella (Jan-Jun 1963) where we did some down range coverage for the Project Mercury Space program, spent a few nights aboard the USS Tallahatchee County (AVB-2) in Suda Bay, Crete and Dechi, Sardenia and made a couple of 'wash rack' trips to Tunis. All this caused an accumulation of about 1700 flight hours for the tour.

Apr 1964 - Apr 1967
VT-4 NAS Pensacola, FL - Spent all my time in the airframes branch keeping the T-2A, T-2B, and T-2C's in the air.

May 1967 - Jun 1970
NAS Guantanamo Bay - Worked in Operations Maintenance on C-54, C-117, UH-34, and HU-16's. Did Maintenance Control, Quality Assurance and HU-16 SAR. Added a few hundred flight hours to my total and finally made AMH1.

Jul 1970 - Apr 1972
HT-8 Ellyson Field, Pensacola, FL - TH-1L and UH-1D airframes branch for the tour. Selected as Navy League Squadron enlisted man of the year for 1971.

May 1972 - Dec 1973
ADCOP Program participant, Associate Degree received from Pensacola Junior College.

Dec 1973 - Feb 1976
NAS Pensacola, FL - Operations Maintenance supporting T-39D, C-117, C-131, and T-28's in Quality Assurance. Finally made it to AMHC !!

Mar 1976 - Apr 1977
VS-41 S-3A FRAMP at NAS North Island, CA., then on to VS-28 at Cecil Field. Was Aircraft Division CPO and was deployed onboard the USS America (Jun-Nov 1976). Promoted to AMCS and later selected for CWO-2 April 1977.

Apr 1977 - Jul 1979
NASC Pensacola LDO/CWO indoctrination then PCS'ed to be O-I-C of the NAESU Det Sigonella, Italy.

Aug 1979 - Oct 1980
HS-15 NAS Jacksonville, FL - SH-3H aircraft, assigned as Maintenance/Material Control officer. Deployment onboard the USS Independence (Aug/Dec 1979) to the Med. Retired 30 October 1980.

After retirement from Uncle Sams finest, I worked for several gov't contractors on Supply projects, and as a technical coordinator for NAVAIR in the reopening of production for the SH-2F by Kaman Aerospace.

In 1983 I was called for a civil service position at NARDAC Pensacola (data processing) and eventually went into DOD after the 1993 BRAC reorganized that area. After being re-assigned to the Defense Mega-Center at Robins AFB, Ga I worked until July 2001 when I retired from civil service and relocated to Pensacola.
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 Pat Schnauffer

MY WIFE,JONI, AND I ARE ORIGINALLY FROM FREDERICK MD. WE WERE HIGH SCHOOL SWEETHEARTS AND HAVE BEEN MARRIED FOR 43 YEARS.

I ENTERED THE NAVY VIA THE UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY IN 1955. AFTER GRADUATION IN JUNE OF 1959, I WENT SOUTH TO PENSACOLA TO START FLIGHT TRAINING. I EVENTUALLY WAS DESIGNATED A NAVAL AVIATION OBSERVER (NAVIGATOR) IN JANUARY 1961.

AFTER SPENDING MANY MONTHS IN TRAINING AT VARIOUS ASW SCHOOLS AND THE RAG AT JACKSONVILLE, I REPORTED TO VP-21 IN OCTOBER 1961.
DURING MY TOUR WITH THE SQUADRON I WAS IN OPERATIONS AND THE ASSISTANT NAV OFFICER WITH GENE SULLIVAN. I WAS DESIGNATED A TACTICAL COORDINATOR IN 1963 AND WAS A MEMBER OF CHARLIE ROBERTSON'S CREW WHEN HE WAS XO AND CO OF THE SQUADRON.

JUST THE OTHER DAY I WAS READING AN ARTICLE IN MY ALUMNI MAGAZINE ABOUT THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS. THAT WAS 40 YEARS AGO AND I STILL REMEMBER OUR CREWS BEING SENT TO ARGENTIA NFLD TO FLY AN AWS BARRIER ABOUT 600 NM LONG TO TRY AND DETECT SOVIET SUBS POSSIBLY HEADING DOWN TOWARD CUBA. WE JUST ABOUT SPENT CHRISTMAS UP THERE BEFORE OUR DEPLOYMENT TO SIGONELLA.

I LEFT VP-21 IN SEPTEMBER 1964 AND TEMPORARLY WENT CIVILIAN UNTIL JULY 1965 WHEN I REQUESTED ACTIVE DUTY WHILE WITH THE READY RESERVES. I WAS ASSIGNED TO FAETULANT IN NORFOLK AND WAS AN INSTRUCTOR AT THE ASW SCHOOL. IN MARCH OF 1968 I WAS TRANSFERED TO VP-42 AT NAS WHIDEBY ISLAND WA AND MADE A DEPLOYMENT WITH THEM TO NAS SANGLEY PT. RPI AND CAM RAHAN BAY SOUTH VIETNAM.

I LEFT ACTIVE DUTY IN JUNE OF 1969; HOWEVER, I AFFILIATED WITH THE NAVAL AIR READY RESERVES AT NAS WHIDBEY ISLAND. I AM A PLANK OWNER IN VP-69, FLEW THE P2V-7 UNTIL WE TRANSITION INTO THE P3-A AND WAS FORTUNATE TO HAVE FLEETED UP TO SERVE AS XO/CO OF THE SQUADRON. I WAS SELECTED FOR 0-6 IN 1982 AND HELD SEVERAL COMMANDS AT NAS WHIDBEY BEFORE RETIRING IN 1989.

AT ONE TIME DURING MY CAREER WITH VP-69 I FLEW WITH BILL COMMINS WHO WAS IN VP-21 1961- ? BILL FLEW WITH NORTHWEST AIRLINES. I HAVE LOST CONTACT WITH HIM. ANOTHER SHIPMATE BEFORE MY TIME WAS BILL MARR. HE WAS IN THE SQUADRON IN THE MID '50S. HE WAS MY PPC WHEN OUR RESERVE GROUP WAS FLYING OUT OF NAS SAND POINT SEATTLE. OUR CLOSEST FRIENDS ARE JERRY AND JOHANNAH KELTNER WHO LIVE UP IN ANACORTES WA. JERRY JOINED THE SQUADRON WHEN WE WERE DEPLOYED TO SIGONELLA IN 1963. OUR PATHS CROSSED AGAIN IN 1972 WHEN JERRY WAS STATIONED AT NAS WHIDBEY IS. WE STILL TELL SEA STORIES ABOUT OUR TIMES WITH THE SQUADRON. REMEMBER THE "SNIFFER" QUALS? HOW ABOUT THE RANDOM JULIE PATTERNS AS A DETECTION TACTIC? (OF COURSE THE SUBS KNEW EXACTLLY WHERE WE WERE) ENOUGH!!

DURING MY NAVAL RESERVE CAREER I WAS HAVING A FANTASTIC CAREER WITH THE BOEING COMPANY IN SEATTLE. I WAS HIRED AS AN INSTRUCTOR AT THE COMMERCIAL FLIGHT CREW TRAINING SCHOOL IN 1969. I OBTAINED AN FAA FLIGHT ENGINEER AND FLIGHT NAVIGATOR LICENSE DURING MY TENURE AS AN INSTRUCTOR. IN 1978 I WAS HIRED BY THE PRODUCTION FLIGHT TEST GROUP AND SPENT 17 YEARS FLYING ON A MULTITUDE OF ASSIGNMENTS. MY PRIMARY JOB WAS ASSISTING CUSTOMERS DELIVER AIRPLANES TO EUROPE AND THE FAR EAST AS A FLIGHT NAVIGATOR. I WAS ALSO QUALIFIED TO FLY THE USAF E-3A AWACS AIRPLANE DURING ENGINEERING AND PRODUCTION TEST FLIGHTS. I WAS INVOLVED IN THE FLIGHT TESTING OF THE NATO, SAUDIA AIR FORCE, AND UK/ROF AWACS AIRCRAFT. I WAS THE CHEIF NAVIGATOR DURING THE FLIGHT TESTING OF THE NAVY E-6B TACCAMO AIRPLANES. DURING MY CAREER IN FLIGHT TEST, I FLEW ON EVERY AIRPLANE MANUFACTURED BY BOEING, INCLUDING THE B777. I RETIRED FROM BOEING IN 1995.

JONI AND I ARE FULLY RETIRED. WE HAVE THREE CHILDREN LIVING IN THE SEATTLE AREA. OUR SON PATRICK WAS A HOSPITAL CORPSMAN IN THE NAVY FOR 10 YEARS AND WAS ON A DD DURING THE GULF WAR. HE HAS ONE SON. OUR OLDEST DAUGHTER MEG WAS BORN IN PORTLAND WHILE WE WERE STATIONED AT BRUNSWICK. SHE HAS TWO LITTLE BOYS WHO WE SPEND ALOT OF HAPPY HOURS WITH. OUR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER BETSY IS SINGLE AND WORKING FOR AT&T.

WE MAKE AN ANNUAL TRIP TO THE BIG ISLAND IN HAWAII DURING THE MONSOONS HERE IN SEATTLE. HOPE TO RETIRE TO ARIZONA IN THE FUTURE.
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 Raphael Semmes Jr.

CDR. Raphael Semmes Jr. as C.O of VP-21, Pax River, 1950.

Raphael Semmes Jr. was born in Montgomery, Alabama 18 January, 1916. He was graduated from high school in Huntsville, AL and attended the Marion Military Institute one year before entering the United States Naval Academy. While at the Academy, he was active in boxing and wrestling. He was graduated from the Academy 2 June, 1938.

His first duty was aboard the cruiser USS Louisville. This tour of duty was relatively short for in 1939 he was ordered aboard the destroyer USS Somers where he served as an Ensign until August 1940. Ensign Semmes then received orders to Pensacola, Florida for flight training.

Upon completion of flight school as a Naval Aviator, Ensign Semmes was ordered to report to the aviation unit of the USS St. Louis. Ensign Semmes remained attached to the St. Louis until December 1942, and was at Pearl Harbor during the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941.

He was then assigned to the CVE Lunga Point as commander of Composite Squadron 98, and led his command in successful attacks on Japanese installations on Okinawa and the China coast. During WWII, Mr. Semmes was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, and two  Air Medals. He attained the O5 rank of Commander on 5 November 1945.

Commander Semmes was the eighth commanding officer of VP-21, from 21 October 1949 to May 1951. CDR. Semmes was deceased at Imperial, California, in January 1981.
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 Bill Spaulding

1958, Norman, OK
1961, VP-21
2003
1995, Marcia and Bill

Bill Spaulding, AT2.     Bill grew up in Ottawa, KS, attended Baker U. in Baldwin, KS for 1 year, joined the Navy in Jan. 1958, went through boot camp in San Diego, Airman school in Norman, OK and Electronics school in Memphis, TN. In Jan. 1959, he was assigned to VP-21 stationed at NAS Brunswick, ME.

He qualified for Aircrew, and was assigned to LH-10 with LT. Al Petrich, PPC;  LT. Bill Locke, Copilot; Angie Spera, PC; Mike Bonay, AT2; Larry McHenry, AE2. During his time in VP-21, he deployed to Argentia, Newfoundland and Sigonella, Sicily and flew over 2,000 hours as Radio operator in P2V-7 Neptunes. Bill's tour of duty was extended due to the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1961 and he participated in the surveillance missions between Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Panama City, Panama.

Following his discharge, Bill worked in the computer industry for 25 years: Field Engineer, Tech Writer, Training Developer, Manager of Tech Writing and Training, Support Division Marketing Manager. During this time, he worked for four different computer companies: IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Memorex, and Amdahl. And he lived in Maine, Connecticut, Long Island NY, Colorado, Upstate New York, France, and Northern California.

In 1986, he started a business “Spaulding Communications” in San Jose, CA, producing and publishing direct mail advertising. In 1993, he and his wife Marcia retired, sold their home and began traveling the west full-time in an RV. In 1994, they started “Western Press”, to develop and publish visitor guides for RV parks, campgrounds, etc. In 1999, they shut down this business and now live in Sun City, Georgetown, TX.

Bill, his wife Marcia and their Cocker Spaniel (Tripper) normally leave the heat, humidity and bugs of central Texas around June for more pleasant places. They usually return in October. Bill enjoys traveling in the RV, hiking, birding, fly fishing, reading, exploring the internet, woodworking, and swimming laps. Bill and Marcia have been married for 20 years. Bill has two sons (Neil and Eric) and one grand daughter (Cheyenne) and Marcia has one son (Jeff).
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 AVCM Gordon Saindon

I started my Navy time much as others do. I went immediately to “boot camp” (Great Lakes). Then to AN”P” school at Norman, OKLA. At the AN “P”, we went through a “screening and classification” which was conducted by a PN2 “Alphabet”. He informed me that I was not qualified to go to AT “A” school, which the recruiter had told me was going to be no sweat. Fortunately for me, PN2 Alphabet was over-ridden by the screening officer.

After graduating from AT “A” school, I was assigned to HS-6, which was located at NAAS Ream Field, Imperial Beach, CA. I was sent directly to the AT shop where I found I had about 19 bosses.  It seems I was the ONLY non-rated man in the shop. Those Petty Officers actually took great care of me. They did not want anything to happen to their new field-day person. Particularly when we scored very high on the first weekly zone inspection. As with most good things, that had to come to an end. I was transferred to the line crew. I found myself working for  ADC Slaven, who ran his crew with an iron fist. When he gave a task, that chore was to be done immediately, correctly and neatly. That is all he requested of his crew. (This chief could have given Chief Watts advanced training on being in charge.) He was my first real experience with working for a task master. And I took notes.

I made AT3 and left HS-6 to go to VR-21, Barbers Point, Hawaii where I fixed the electronic equipment on the R6D (C118) when I was not out flying as a radioman. I spent two years in VR-21 and made AT2 before being transferred to VR-7/8 at Moffett Field. They were flying R7V's. I had only six more months before I was due to get out (does anyone read short-timer?). So the squadron sent me TAD to the Navy mothball base, Litchfield Park near Phoenix, AZ. While there I decided to reenlist.

Little did I know, as soon as I reenlisted, I received a set of orders to report to NAS Brunswick, VP-21. Being a West Coast sailor, I thought I was headed for Brunswick, GA. Brrrrrr, was I wrong! I arrived in Brunswick, ME in the middle of February. And I learned the squadron was due to go on a split deployment, half to Sigonella, Sicily, half to Keflavik, Iceland. I was asked which site I would prefer---Immediately I choose Sig. I was informed that I was being put on CAC 11, as the radioman, and CAC 11 was headed for Kef.  So much for choosing the warm climate. I flew with CAC 11 (AD2/1 Charley McGourty, AD3 Stevenson, AO1 Harry Worwetz, AMC Joe Clemente, AT2 Jim Besse, AT3 Larry Schwartz, and AE2 Keith McFarren) for about 38 months while stationed at Brunswick. During this period I made AT1, and we had the above mentioned split deployment, went to Argentia for the Cuban Missile crisis (and stayed an extra two plus months because one of our sister squadrons from Brunswick could not handle their mission, so our three  did what their six aircraft could not do. We had another deployment to Kef, and one more deployment, finally to Sigonella.

CAC 11- Sigonella, Sicily Feb 1963

Back Row-second from left-Lcdr Satre, PPC and Maintenance Officer

Front Row-Unknown 2nd Mech,  AO2 Max Unknown, AE1 Unknown, AT3 Larry Schwartz, AD1 Charles McGourty, AMC Joseph Clemente,  AT3 Unknown, AT1 Gordon Saindon

AO1 Harry Worwetz had just recently been assigned as AO Shop Supervisor
AE2 Keith McFarren had just recently left the Navy
AT2 James Besse had just recently left the Navy
I am not certain why AD3 (maybe AD2) Jerry Stevenson had recently left the crew.
AMC Clemente was assigned to be AM shop chief just a short while after the photo
AT1 Gordon Saindon received orders for VR3 and left just a short while after the photo

I transferred from VP-21 to VR3, McGuire AFB, NJ. This tour lasted about 8 or 10 months before the Navy, in its finite wisdom, transferred me again. This time to RVAH-3, NAS Sanford, FL. When I checked in, I was informed I would be Duty Section Leader and it would be up to me to develop the watch bill for the section. They handed me a roster of my section and told me the watch list was already made up for the next two duty days. Imagine my surprise when I found a name I recognized on the roster. It was (still PN2) “Alphabet” from my days in AN'P' school. It was a good thing I had been trained to be a good sailor by Chief Slaven.

RVAH-3 was the RAG squadron for the sea-going RVAH's. I left that outfit after two lifetimes (it seemed) and went somewhere I had no desire to go back to---NATTC Memphis for AV “I” B school. But it was the only way I could get away from the “recco heavies”.

Upon completion of “B” school, I was notified I was going back to Sanford to join RVAH-7. Once the Navy tattoos a tailhook on your posterior it never comes off. We made a couple of West Pac cruises to visit the warm waters of the south China Sea. Then we made a “Med” cruise during which I was advanced to ATC. I was transferred while on that Med cruise to return to the West Coast.

I went to a NamTraDet (NAMTD) to instruct on computer aided Test Consoles for electronic equipment. I did this for several years, made ATCS and was presented with a set of TAD orders to join the Naval Education group, located in beautiful downtown Burbank area at the Lockheed Plant.

Lockheed was building the S3A. And since I had experience in ASW and electronic test consoles they thought I would be a perfect fit for this project. Upon roll-out of the S3A, my services were no long required in Burbank, so the Navy returned me to San Diego and placed me in the S3A NAMTD. However about this time someone realized the tailhook they had tattooed me with had not seen any deep salt water in a long time.

Again, in the Navy's finite wisdom, they transferred me to VS-38, which was flying S2F's. This lasted about 4-6 months. The Navy again issued transfer orders and sent me across the hall to the sister squadron VS-37, where they had originally planned to send me but made a “clerical” error.
After several West Pac cruises VS-37 was scheduled to get rid of their S2F's and be transitioned to the S3A. I made AVCM at this time. They wanted me to sign an extension of my sea duty which would last until two years after they received their S3A's. I respectfully declined their kind offer.

Since I had just made AVCM I was transferred to a VAW squadron in need of a maintence chief. They were still flying E1B's. As it turned out, this squadron was selected to be decommissioned. And I was again made available to be dispersed to the wild winds. I was sent to Whidbey Island to join VAQ-133, which flew EA6B's and was due for an imminent deployment to the Med.

This cruise was about as close to a luxury ocean voyage for a person like me who had been the maintenance chief for three straight deployments. I was assigned as the Command Master Chief. After the deployment on the Kennedy, I was transferred back to NAMTD San Diego at Miramar. There I became the CPOIC for West Coast VAST (Versatile Avionic Systems Test) systems for both the S3A and F14 weapon systems. With only two stations available for training, I did the unthinkable in the training environment. I established evening and midnight training sessions in order to properly train the quantity of personnel needed by the Pacific Fleet. These machines were being used around the clock Monday through Friday and we were barely capable of keeping up with the amount of operators and technicians needed.

I decided to transfer to the Fleet Reserve at the end of that tour and open an AVCM slot for some other individual.  I then went to work for a defense contractor (Link Flight Simulation) in upstate New York. This was not a good choice for a kid who had grown up in the desert of New Mexico.  However, I stayed there for about thirteen years at which time they offered me early retirement. I grabbed it and ran (drove) as fast as I could for the desert of Las Vegas, Nevada. And here I remain

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 Donald E. Sullivan
1937 - 1994
Sigonella, Sicily, 1960
NAS Brunswick, 1978

Donald E. Sullivan of 1502 Washington St., Bath Maine, died on 7 May 1994 at the Mid Coast Hospital.

Don was born in Dubuque, Iowa on 1 August 1937 to Francis and Pearl Sullivan. He graduated from Dubuque High School and later from New Hampshire College. He joined the Navy in August 1955, and married Patricia Ann Mynahan on 29 August 1959. Patricia Ann died 11 September 1986.

Don served in VP-21 from 1957 to 1960, primarily as a flight crew member. Among other duty stations, Don also served in Viet Nam. Don was well-liked and respected by all of his shipmates, serving 23 years in the Navy, and retiring in October1978 as an AT Senior Chief Petty Officer.

After retirement from the Navy, Don worked for Vitro Labs in Bath, ME, and in New Jersey, for ten years. He then worked for Bath Iron Works for five years as a team test coordinator on the Aegis program.

Don was a member of the Brunswick Elks Lodge, and volunteered with the American Red Cross Coastal Regiment. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, and spending time at his home on Pleasant Pond.

He was survived by his fiancee Cyndi Kennerson of Bath; three sons, Michael F. of Durham, David T. and Scott A. of Brunswick; daughter Mrs. Kenneth (Donna) Thiele of Lisbon; three sisters, Mrs. Wayne (Marcella)Amling of Dubuque, Mrs. Leroy (Margaret) Pape of Mission, TX, and Mrs. Roger (Bernie) Hirsch of Crossville, TN; and nine grandchildren. Don was predeceased by his brother Charles.

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 Edward Trybala

UNITED STATES -PATROL BOMBING SQUADRON 111
VPB 111
June 4, 2004 SUBJECT: Change of Duty


Edward Trybala's Final and Complete Orders for Change of Duty.

1. He has been detached from this world and all his earthly goods as of June 3, 2004.
2. He will proceed via first class Transportation to Heaven's Open Doors, and will report to
commander's and crews that have gone on before.
3. The orders remain in effect until we all can join him in his new home port.
4. No other transportation necessary, no other words needed to be said.
Orders-Change of Duty.
5. Full authority of these orders is part of the divine plan of the Almighty contained in
St. John 14. l-4: Let not your hearts be troubled; ye believe in God, believe also in me.

In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to
prepare a place for you.
And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that
where I am, there ye may be also. And whither I go you know, and the way you know.
Additional information for those on deck to follow.

It was a privilege to serve with this shipmate and be a part of his early years. To the family and friends, may you be comforted in knowing he is and will be remembered in many ways but most of all his poetry he gave to the crew.
59 years ago, 29 May 1945, The Crew, VPB111 Received orders-Change of Duty to come home, relieved of duty.

From: The Commanding Officer.
To: Lieutenant Harold Hall Ashton, USNR.
The officers and enlisted men in the crew were:

Lieutenant Harold Robert Hutchinson, USNR
Ensign Jerome Richard Hanzel,
Bell, James Gilbert
Brauner, Frank Herman
Gibson, James Corbett
LaCount, Kenneth Donald
Leonetti, Sam
Mills, Farville Kirkwood, Jr.
Trybala, Edward
Barton, Samuel Leo
Connolly, Gerald W.
It was with great happiness the crew headed for home after many years of service together.
Ed has headed for home.
Over and Out,

Shipmate Bud Mills

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 D.J.'Duke' Turner

Duke  passed away in April of this year after a long illness. He was in VPB-111 and was a crew member in R. L. Flemings "Doc's Delight" PB4Y-1.

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Richard B. Stein

I joined the Naval Air Reserve in Jacksonville, Florida in the spring of 1966 in the 2x6 program. I went to a 12-week boot camp in Jacksonville during the summer. I went to AFU-A electronics school in Millington, Tn. during the summer of 1968. I made E-4 as an "AX" rate before going on active duty in Charleston, SC in Jan of 1969.  After a few weeks at Charleston I was assigned to VP-21. I left for Brunswick, Me. in February 1969. They had already left for deployment to Sigonella, Scicily. I flew commercial to Scicily to join them. I went to work in the electronics shop and after a few weeks the chief asked if I was interested in joining a aircrew. I volunteered and was assigned to the skippers crew operating all types of electronics. I switched to the new flying rate of AW shortly there after. I did alot of flying around the Mediterranean with a great trip to Palma de Majorca of Spain. We flew back to Brunswick that summer and heard we were de-commisioning. I was re-assigned in October to VP-8 in Patuxent River, Md. flying on P-3 Orions. I made one deployment to NAS Bermuda in the spring of 1970 and then returned late that summer. I made E-5 rate then. I got an early discharge in October 1970 and went home to Jacksonville. I did fly for four more years on reserve status and really enjoyed it. I took the E-6 exam but never made it. There were very few 1st class petty officer's for AW's in the reserves.
 
In 1986 I visited the Vietnam Memorial in DC. After a tearful visit I was very thankful for the luck of the draw in my Naval assignments during a very dangerous period in our lives.

 

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Ronald G. Tewers

PORT CLINTON: Ronald G. Tewers, 79, of Port Clinton passed away, Thursday, May 19, 2011 at Edgewood Manor Nursing Center, Port Clinton, OH. He was born on September 04, 1931 in Toledo, OH the son of George J. and Edith C. (Bennett) Tewers.

He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War from 1951 to 1955. On August 01, 1952 in Port Clinton at St. John Lutheran Church, he married Carolyn "Carrie" Brindley and she survives. Ron worked as an installer for Young's Floor Covering and in sales and service for Brindley Appliance. Ron was a member of St. John Lutheran Church and belonged to the Carver's club at the church. He loved to work on cars and fix things. Ron was an all around handyman. He was a member of the Oliver H. Perry Masonic Lodge #341 F. & A.M., American Legion Post #113, member and former trustee of the Port Clinton Yacht Club, Power Squadron, Colonial Club and the Boy Scouts. Ron will be greatly missed by his loving family and friends. Survivors include: loving wife of 58 years, Carolyn "Carrie" Tewers of Port Clinton, OH; sons, Matthew R. Tewers of Northwood, OH and Mark W. (Melissa) Tewers of Findlay, OH; daughter, Cynthia A. (Eric) Rumball of Port Clinton, OH; grandchildren, Shaylyn (Greg) Ford, Megan "May" Tewers, Landon Tewers, Phillip Tewers, Micah Tewers, Micarah Tewers, Carter Rumball and Tytan Rumball; great-grandchild, Ella Ford. Ron was preceded in death by his parents and sister, Carol Smith.

Visitation will be 3-7 p.m., Sunday, May 22, 2011 at Gerner-Wolf-Walker Funeral Home & Crematory, Port Clinton, OH, followed by a Masonic Lodge service at 7:00 p.m. Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. James Lehman & Rev. Dan Keck at 11:00 a.m., Monday, May 23, 2011 in the funeral home. Interment will be in Union Cemetery, Oak Harbor, OH. Memorial contributions may be given in memory of Ron to St. John Lutheran Church or Stein Hospice, Sandusky. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.walkerfuneralhomes.com.

Published in the News Herald on May 20, 2011

 

 

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Wayne E. Sanders

From the obituary of Wayne E. Sanders, 94, of Jefferson City, passed away Tuesday, April 2, 2013 at Heisinger Bluffs. He was born December 10, 1918 in Fort Dodge, Iowa, Jane E. Weise his wife for 49 years, preceded him in death.

Wayne graduated from Spencer High School and attended Estherville Junior College in Estherville, Iowa. He proudly served in the United States Navy during World War II, serving as chief petty officer in the European, African, and Pacific theaters. Wayne retired from the Unites States Fish and Wildlife Service where he was the agent in charge of law enforcement for the State of Missouri from 1963 to 1971 and for the New England Region from 1971 to 1976.

Wayne was one of the most well-known antique collectors in the Midwest. He had one of the largest antique marble collections in the United States. He also collected antique toys, Native American artifacts, duck decoys and cobalt glass. His pride and joy was his 1951 Ford Woody Station Wagon which he purchased new. Wayne was also a member of the Mid-Missouri Old Car Club and National Marble Collectors.

 

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Arthur Lloyd Trimble

I enlisted into the Naval Reserve Air Base at Oakland, California on December 19, 1939 and was assigned to Squadron VS-15R.  I later received active duty orders to report to NRAB Oakland on October 10, 1940 and this continued through July 1943.  I then was assigned to duty at NAS Livermore, California from July through December 26, 1943.

I received orders to report to the USN Photography School at Pensacola, Florida starting on January 2, 1944 and completed the four months training course in April, graduating as a Photographers Mate First Class.

I then received orders to Aerial Gunners School from May through June 1944 at NAS Jacksonville, Florida for additional training as a combat air crew member aboard the PB4Y-1 aircraft.  I was then assigned to the crew of Lt. William C. Bender as First Photographer and Tail Turret Gunner.

In November 1944, our flight crew received ten days leave followed with orders to report to NAAS Camp Kearny, San Diego, California, for additional air combat training.

The following month, we were transferred via troop ship to Pearl Harbor, and, on arrival, given orders to report to NAS Kaneohe, Oahu for further search and strike patrol training. 

During January 1945, we transferred to Johnston Island for two weeks of daily patrol duty and then were sent to NAS Rogers Field, Oahu.  On arrival there, we were then assigned to VPB-111 and departed to report to our squadron on February 15, 1945 at Leyte, Philippines Islands.

Our first patrol was on February 18, 1945, when we were assigned to drop leaflets over Swatow, China during a flight time of 14.4 hours.  We completed nine combat flights that totaled 120.7 hours while operating from the Tacloban airstrip on the shore of Leyte Gulf.

 

On April 12, 1945, our squadron began moving to Puerto Princessa, Palawan, Philippine Islands.  We began our first of 30 more missions from this base on a 14.5 hour patrol to the area surrounding Singapore.  This was followed by assigned strikes and reconnaissance patrols throughout the surrounding Southwest Pacific areas, including Okinawa, Swatow and Amoy, China, Singapore, and all coasts of Borneo and the Celebes, as well as many other areas.  My crew members and I destroyed or damaged 12 enemy aircraft and 32 various supply and armed ships.

While on Palawan, we had completed 496.6 more hours of patrols for a total time of 590.3 hours on combat missions.  Our last mission was on August 15, 1945; we were two hours outbound when we received a recall to return to base as the war was now over!

Five days later, we were transferred from VPB-111 to Fleet Air Wing #2 at Pearl Harbor, with orders to the USS Maryland for transfer to San Diego (arriving six days later).  Within a week after arriving in San Diego, I arrived by train at Camp Parks, California, where I received my Active Duty Honorable Discharge on October 3, 1945.

I re-enlisted at the Naval Reserve Air Station, Oakland, California on October 3, 1946 as Photographers Mate First Class and was assigned to Squadron VF-77R.  I was promoted to Chief Petty Officer, Photographer, on December 11, 1948.  All personnel and aircraft were transferred from Oakland to NAS Alameda NARTU in March 1962, and I was then assigned to Air Wing Staff 87-(L).  I retired on March 24, 1963. 

During my Navy career, I received the Distinguished Flying Cross, nine Air Medals, Combat Aircrew Wings with three stars, American Defense Medal, Asiatic Pacific Campaign with two battle stars, and many other medals and awards.

My entire civilian career was spent with Foster & Kleiser outdoor advertising, first as a photographer and eventually as Sales Promotion Manager.  I married Jacquelyn Adams on November 26, 1942, and we had two children, Michael and Patricia. 

 

Note: Chief Trimble was born November 9, 1920 and he passed away November 7, 2012 (just missed 92 by 2 days).

 

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Richard G. Seeds

On April 4, 2013, 69 yrs. old, of Roxborough passed away. Richard was a veteran of  ....Patrol Squadron 21 and was a retired building manager. Beloved husband of Fran (McMenamin) Seeds. Devoted father of Richard (Colleen) Seeds, Meghan (Tim) Kirby and Patrick Seeds. Cherished grand-father of Madison and Juliana. Brother of Elaine Weil and Ethel Fielding; survived by nieces and nephews.

 

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Robert N. Sylvain

Robert N. Sylvain, United States Navy, Retired, 80, passed away on January 28, 2013 in Haines City, FL of lung failure. Robert was born on October 5, 1932 in Lewiston, ME and moved to Haines City in 1991 from Points of Rocks, MD. He was an aviation electronic technician for the US Navy for some 20 years and a member of St Ann Catholic Church, Haines City. He is survived by his wife, of 58 years, Kathleen C. Sylvain; children, Mark (Doreen) Sylvain of Williamsport, MD, Donna Sylvain of Shippensburg, PA and Dolores Sylvain of Frederick, MD as well as 2 grandchildren.

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Norwood L. Speary

Norwood LeRoy Speary , age 90, of Homosassa, Florida.... was born July 14, 1923 in Marcus Hook, PA, son of Roy and Selina (Millington) Speary. He died April 11, 2014 under the loving care of Hospice of Citrus County and his family. Mr. Speary was a US Navy veteran serving during WWII in both theaters of combat. He retired as a Fire Inspector for the City of St. Petersburg and moved to Homosassa in 1974. Mr. Speary was a member of First United Methodist Church, Homosassa. He is survived by his wife of 68 years: Clara Evelyne Speary, Homosassa; a son: Kirk Roy Speary, Round Rock, TX; 2 daughters: Sherry Lee Gianakas, Lake City, FL; Dareen Lee McCall, Jacksonville, FL, 9 Grandchildren, 13 Great Grandchildren, 4 Great Great Grandchildren. Arrangements are under the direction of the Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory.

On June 8, 2014, "Bud" Mills wrote: "Sunset came on April 22, 2013 for Norwood L. Sperry, AOM,  joining many of his buddies from Crew 5, VPB 111, VPB 11, who have gone on before.  Norwood L. Sperry, AOMc3, member of Crew 5, born July 14, 1923, died April 11, 2014 in Homosassa, Florida.  Burial at Bushnell National Cemetery, Florida.  He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 69 years, Three loving children, two daughters and one son,  grand children and great grand children, many friends and firefighters.  He is remembered by his fellow crew men from Crew 5, with love and respect; H. H. Ashton, Lt(jg), Leonetti, Sam AMM2c.  Mills, F. K. “Bud” AOM 1c.  Always proud to have served with him and proud to be his friend. 




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William V. Scherbon

Merrimac, MA — William Vasily Scherbon, age 82, lifetime Merrimac resident, died July 7, 2014 at the Anna Jaques Hospital in Newburyport, surrounded by his loving family. He was the beloved husband of Marjorie M. (Christesen) Scherbon, his wife of 62 years.

 

Bill was born in Peabody, Aug. 25, 1931, one of two children of the late Samuel S. and Anna I. (Hontar) Scherbon. He grew up on a working farm, and attended Merrimac schools, where he played baseball, basketball and football, and attended Boy Scouts. He graduated from Merrimac High School in 1950 and shortly after joined the U.S. Navy, serving as a Machinist Mate First Class during the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Towards the end of his service, he was a S.E.R.E. survival instructor in Rangley, Maine. He received an honorable discharge in 1974 after 24 years of dedicated service to his country.

After his military retirement, he drove tractor trailer rigs and worked on RV trailers for a short time. In the late 1970s, Bill began working for his son, Scott, Sr., fixing lawnmowers, working on small engines, generators, and eventually went to work in Amesbury at Scherbon Consolidated.

Bill owned, operated and flew his own J-3 cub and also had a 1956 T-Bird for several years. He loved attending his military reunions where his buddies called him “Pappy”. Others knew him as “Wild Willie” or “Bill." He was a member of the 10,000 Hour Flying Club, DAV, and had served on the Merrimac Auxiliary Police Department. He was a lifetime member of Laurel Grange of West Newbury, formerly Merrimac, Bethany Lodge, A.F. & A.M. of Newburyport, formerly Merrimac, and the American Legion.

Bill loved the land he spent his life on and could often be seen mowing the fields on his blue tractor. He loved watching his land be farmed and would sit outside watching for deer and turkeys. He loved his wife, son, daughters, grandchildren and their spouses, and most recently showing and watching his great-grandchildren color Easter eggs with him. The farm has been a special place for Bill, his family and friends, and will remain that in years to come. Bill’s greatest joys were his family, friends and nature. He will be deeply missed.

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Robert J (Bob) Strickland

Robert (Bob) J. Strickland passed away on Saturday, March 23, 2013, in Woodstock, GA.  

Bob was born on October 28, 1943, in Hastings, Nebraska. Following his years of military duty in the U.S. Navy, Bob pursued a career at IBM, retiring after 25 years of service. Bob is preceded in death by his stepfather, E. A. Turner, and by his in-laws, Mary and Clyde Orr. 

He is survived by his wife, Lynne Orr Strickland; his sons, Mike and Danny; his mother, Venus Turner; his sister, Donrue Ingram and her family; his stepsister, Sandy Dennison and her family; his sister-in-law, Jeanne Thomas and her family; and his brothers-in-law, Donald Orr and Douglas Orr and their families.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Bob's memory to Everyday Angels, Inc. (donate online at everydayangels.info or mail to 2449 Towne Lake Pkwy., Woodstock, GA 30189) or to Papas Pantry (donate online at papaspantry.org or mail to 6551 Commerce Pkwy., Suite 200, Woodstock, GA 30189).

The family wishes to extend their gratitude to the Vanderbilt Medical Center, to Georgia Cancer Specialists, and to the many family members and friends who provided support and love during the course of his illness
.

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James G. (Jim) Sperry

James "Jim" G. Sperry, 78, died March 6, 2015, at Circle of Life Hospice, in Bentonville Ark.  Born Dec. 14, 1936, at Joplin, Mo., he was the son of David J. and Virginia Mayo Sperry, and was the second of eight children.  Jim was preceded in death by his parents; sisters, Lillian Green and Judith Heikkila; brother, Stephen Sperry; and son, Douglas Sperry.  He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Gloria S. (Ellis) Sperry, of Bella Vista Ark., son, Brent Sperry (wife, Janice), of Rogers Ark.; grandchildren, Brad, Michael, Steven, Rebecca, Jacob, Elizabeth, Patrick and Kara; five great-grandchildren, Gabriel, William, Hadley, Harper and Mason; and his mother-in-law, Fern Ellis, of Rogers. Also, brother David (wife, Carolyn) Sperry, of Largo Fla.; sisters, Miriam Clemmons, of Pinellas Park Fla., Susan Humphrey (husband, Shain), of Omaha Neb., and Kathy Baker (husband, Max), of Farmington, Utah; and numerous nieces and nephews. 

Jim liked to hunt, fish and restore old cars. He served in the US Navy as an avionics technician and loved to fly. After leaving the military, he worked as a field engineer for Smith Corona, Marchant, and Eastman Kodak. He retired in 1991, after a long career.

He lived a life of service and was a Boy Scout leader for many years, deacon in the Baptist church, three term American Legion Commander for Post 341 in Bella Vista and was on the Veterans Council board of directors for 12 years. He was instrumental in building the Wall of Honor veterans memorial in Bella Vista.

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Kazimier "Ski" Szczepanski

Kazimier Z (Ski) John Szczepanski, 93, of The Highlands, passed away Saturday peacefully with his family by his side March 21, 2015. He was born in Trenton, New Jersey on February 25, 1922 a son of Adam Szczespanski and Katherine Rogowoki. He attended Trenton schools and earned his GED.

In 1942 he joined the Navy during World War II and flew with Lighter than Air-Blimp. In 1943 he completed gunnery school and saw combat in a Naval Liberator B-24 as a tail gunner. Ski always said, “He wanted to see them coming”. In 1946, after the war Ski went on to Catapult School and was a plank owner on the U.S.S. Coral Sea. In 1953 he attended Blimp School. In 1953 he was transferred to B.N.A.S. where he worked hard making his rank of Senior Chief.

While stationed at B.N.A.S. Ski met and married the love of his life, Amilda “Millie” Comeau on March 15, 1956.  They resided in Bath and raised their family.

In 1967 Ski attained the rank of Full Lieutenant and later retired in 1973 after 30 years of service. He loved getting further educated and after his service attended school to become a realtor and did taxes as well. He received his B.A. in business from New Hampshire College in 1978.

Ski is predeceased by his parents; his wife of 58 years Millie; a brother Henry Szczepanski; a grandson Kyle John Szczepanski; and a great granddaughter Chloe Douglas.

He survived by a sister Irene Helsel of New Jersey; his five children, four sons John E Szczepanski & his wife Kara of West Bath, Charles Douglas and wife Pauline of Lewiston, Gregory Douglas and wife Sara of Dyer Brook, Gordon Douglas and wife Alison of New Hampshire; daughter Terri Barris of Westbrook; 11 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren; as well as many nieces and nephews.

Visiting hours will be held on Friday March 27, 2015 from 4-6 at David E Desmond & Son Funeral Home 638 High Street Bath with a Mass of Christian burial to take place on Saturday at 10am at All Saints Parish, St. Mary’s Catholic Church 144 Lincoln Street, Bath.

In lieu of flowers donations in Ski’s memory may be made to the;  Bath Masonic Lodge building fund P.O. Box 274 Bath, Maine or to the Bath VFW P.O. Box 725 Bath, Maine.

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James T. Samuel Jr.

James Thomas Samuel, Jr. thumbnail James Thomas Samuel, Jr. age 89, of Wilmington, passed away on Monday, May 2, 2016, at home, in the warm embrace of his family.

He was born on July 28, 1926, in Scranton, PA., the son of the late James Thomas Samuel and the late Pauline Puhala.

James served his country with honor and distinction in the United States Navy and retired as a Chief Aviation Storekeeper. After his retirement he continued to work as an executive for Foster Wheeler.

James is survived by his wife of 32 years, Patricia Case Samuel, three children; James T. Samuel III, Greg Samuel and wife Donna, and grandsons Gregory and Eric Samuel, and Paula Samuel Mahoney and husband John, two step children; Jennifer Paetzold-Garcia and husband John, and Jerry Paetzold and three step-grandchildren Justin, Cole and Emily Grob. Together with his parents he was predeceased by his brother David Samuel and his first wife Margaret Samuel.

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John A. Swainbank Jr.

John Allen Swainbank - Obituary

John Allen “Jay” Swainbank of Craftsbury passed away on April 16, 2018, in The Villages, Florida, after a lengthy hospital stay. He was 75. Jay grew up in St. Johnsbury, the son of John and Louise Swainbank. He has resided in Craftsbury in recent years with his wife Cheryl Crytzer.

Jay graduated from St. Johnsbury Academy in the Class of 1960, and from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1964. As a Navy pilot, he flew surveillance aircraft based in Brunswick, Maine; Pensacola, Florida; and in the Mediterranean.

After the service, he began his career in manufacturing, living in Pennsylvania, Colorado, and Illinois, where he earned a Masters in Business Administration from Northwestern University.

Jay returned to Vermont in 1988 and enjoyed a new career in the Vermont Department of Buildings as a Project Manager. He retired in 2004.

Jay was predeceased by his first wife Hilary Norman, and his parents John and Louise Swainbank. He is survived by his wife Cheryl, siblings Anne Brooks and her husband Arthur, Dan Swainbank and wife Mary, and Joe Swainbank and wife Lillian; his children are Mark Swainbank (Alesia) and Paige Delaune (Rob). His step-children are Anna Crytzer (Caleb) and Ben Crytzer. Grandchildren are Kyle, Sol, Elijah, Dylan, Adrian, Andrew, Cameron and Fiona.

Jay had an excellent singing voice, and performed in productions of the Lyric Theater in Burlington. In retirement, he was a substitute teacher in Hardwick and Craftsbury. Jay was famous for (and it is still talked about) flying very low over St. Johnsbury in a large Navy P2V aircraft. Other pastimes included reading, kayaking, and contra dancing. As a volunteer, he delivered meals on wheels, and worked at the Hardwick Area Food Pantry and the Craftsbury Library. He dearly loved spending time with his grandchildren.

A celebration of his life for family and friends will be held at a later date.

 

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