(M) Biographies


Mackenzie, Alexander H.

Madden, Paul C.

Martell, Walter

Maryon, John Ellsworth "Jack"

McCarthy, John J.

McKeown, Robert P.

Mays, Michael R.

McHale, Joseph J.

Megee, Theodore A.

Melville, Noel

Messer, David

Mills, Farville K. "Bud"

Mott, Charles D.

Mueller, Joseph F.

Muntz, Merlyn D.



 John J. McCarthy

 

Active Duty Service Dates: 1942-1946
Retired as Lieutenant, USN
During World War II, he was a Naval Aviator in VPB-111, and he flew  convoy protection missions in both the European and Pacific theaters. He received the Distinguished Flying Cross.

John J. McCarthy, 83, a retired chief administrative law judge with the Merit Systems Protection Board, died of lung cancer May 13 at his home in Silver Spring. Mr. McCarthy retired in 1985 after a 30-year career with the board and its predecessor, the Civil Service Commission. He then served until 1990 as a member of the State Department's Foreign Service Grievance Board.

In retirement, he divided his time among his family, volunteer work, playing tennis and tending to a small orchard of apple and peach trees at his home.

As a volunteer, he sponsored immigrant families through Catholic Charities, and he collected and delivered groceries to the Shepherd's Table food bank in Silver Spring.

He played tennis at least three times a week and competed in tournaments held by the U.S. Tennis Association Seniors and Super Seniors organizations.

Mr. McCarthy, a native of Boston, was a graduate of Boston College and its law school.
He served as a naval aviator during World War II and flew B-24 (PB4Y) combat and convoy protection missions in Europe and the Pacific.  His military decorations included the Distinguished Flying Cross.

He was a member of Resurrection Catholic Church in Burtonsville.
Survivors include his wife of 54 years, Marie E. McCarthy of Silver Spring; four children, John J. McCarthy Jr. of Gaithersburg, Thomas C. McCarthy of San Diego, Eleanor M. McCarthy of Rockville and Patricia A. Drisko of Bethesda; a sister; and a grandson.

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 Noel Melville
2/8/1932 - 6/2/2004


Noel Melville, born February 8, 1932 in Detroit, MI to Donald and Eva
Melville, passed away June 2, 2004. He was raised in Gross Pointe, MI.

He graduated from Duke University in 1954 and entered the US Navy Flight
Training Program and became a Naval Aviator. Noel was in VP-21 from 1963
to 1966. His last tour of duty was as Commanding Officer Naval Station, Adak,
Alaska retiring 1979 with 26 years of service. He then joined The United Services
Insurance Agency and starteda new career which took him from Alaska to
California to Washington, wherehe retired again in 1995. He returned to California
in 1998 and settled in Auburn.

He was a member of Fairfield-Suisun Rotary Club and Auburn Rotary Club. Noel
was also a Paul Harris Fellow. He was active in the Fairfield-Suisun Chamber
of Commerce from 1985-1992. He served on the Vestry of St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, Auburn, CA.

He is survived by his wife, Edna Melville and three sons, Mark of
Pleasanton, Keith of San Diego and Chris of Santa Cruz and eight
grandchildren. Visitation will be at the Bryan-Braker Funeral Home, 1850 W.
Texas St., Fairfield, CA on Monday, June 7 from 5 to 9 PM. Funeral service
will be held Tuesday, June 8 at 10 AM at the Rockville Cemetery Chapel, 4219
Suisun Valley Road, Suisun, CA. Burial will be in Rockville Cemetery with
full military honors.
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 Jack Maryon

Sigonella,1960 F.J.Kelly, Jack Maryon

 
Malta, 1958

Brunswick, 2002

San Diego, 2002


Jack Maryon - Parachute Rigger.
Joined VP-21 Sept. 1958 in Malta.
Transferred to NAS Mphs. Feb. 1961.
1961 - 1964 Mphs.
1964 - 1967 VF-32 Cecil Field / Oceania.
1967 - 1970 Instructor Duty, Lakehurst, N.J.
1971 - 1974 VF-213 NAS (now MCAS) Miramar until retirement July 29, 1974
Southwestern College / National University - AS & BA.
Joined U.S.Customs 1980 and rose to the rank of Commander.
Retired January 3, 1999.
Enjoying Life.
After retiring I bought a big boat and been going ocean fishing off the coast of San Diego, CA. My wife and I took a trip back to Brunswick in May 2001. Much to my surprise, not much changed. In April 2002 I received an e-mail from U.S. Customs asking if I would consider doing a job for them. My first two questions were, where do you want me to go, and how much are you going to pay me. After getting the answer to my questions I said, "send me the airline tickets".
My first trip of three sent me to England, Kyrgystan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, and Germany. I came home to San Diego for four days, trip number two took me to Germany, Ukraine, Moldova, Romania, Bulgaria, and England. By now I am starting to grow wings. This time I was home for 10 days. The third and final trip took me to Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, MALTA, and England.

I traveled more in two months than I did during my entire Naval career. Malta was a surprise, "The Gut" was gone, and wall to wall traffic. I had planned on renting a motorcycle like I did in 1958. No way, I would not have survived the traffic.
I did visit the walled city of Medina, Kalafrana waterfront ( Shortley's Bar is still there). We drove to the old hanger, saw the runway, and control tower. As I walked down Republic St. (The Gut) I thought I heard voices calling me in to have a beer. I would shake my head and the voices from the past were gone. We were in Malta for five enjoyable days. Malta was the conclusion of my trip. I returned home July 11, 2002.

Anyone jealous?????
On October 7, 2002 my wife and I took another vacation starting in Brunswick to see what we missed last year. I'm looking forward to the reunion next year.

Jack Maryon

 

June 14, 1938-Nov. 13, 2007
John Ellsworth Maryon, 69, of El Cajon died Nov. 13. He was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and was a U.S. Customs supervisor. He was retired from the Navy and was a veteran of the Vietnam War.
Survivors include his wife, Carol Maryon; son, John Maryon of Carlsbad; stepdaughters, Deborah Hock of La Mesa and Sandra Justman of Foster City; stepson, Robert Hock of Manhattan, N.Y.; and five grandchildren.
Services: none announced.
Inurnment: 11 a.m. Thursday, Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, Cabrillo Memorial Drive, Point Loma.
Donations: San Diego Hospice, 4311 Third Ave., San Diego, CA 92103.
Arrangements: El Camino Memorial-La Mesa Chapel.

 

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 Bud Mills

1945, Oahu, HI
1945, Palawan, P.I.
PB4Y, BuNo 38822
1943, Port Lyautey, F.M.
LR: Joe Palmer, Jim Gibson, Bud Mills
2003, Placerville, CA

FARVILLE K. “Bud” MILLS, ACOM.USN, RET.

Born, 1924 at Anaheim Landing, California,  just South of Seal Beach to Bud and Maggie Mills. Attended schools in East Hollywood, California, known as Los Feliz District. The “ back-lots” and “sound stages” of several motion picture studios were my playgrounds as a child.  Friendships developed in those early days remain to this day.

I joined the Navy in November, 1941 hoping to be in submarines.  Attended Ordnance School in San Diego specializing in torpedoes.  My first assignment was to the Receiving Ship at Breezy Point, Norfolk, Va. Then Assigned to T.T.S.A.

Assigned to Lt. Com. M. H. Tuttle’s crew upon commissioning of VP- 201, at Norfolk Naval Air Station as Bow Gunner and Bombardier, flying PBM 3's.   Primary duty of VP- 201 was A.S.W. In the Bermuda Triangle, based at Banana River, Norfolk and Bermuda.  Also, escorting ship convoys from the States to England.

August, 1943, V. B. 111 was commissioned at Norfolk, Naval Air Station, operating Navy PB4Y- l’s, (B-24's).  Again I remained on Lt. Com. Tuttle’s crew, #5.  Our first pilot was Lt.(j.g.) H. H. Ashton.  Duty Assignment of  VB-111, was A.S.W., out of St. Eval, England, then to Port Lyautey, French Morocco.  Biggest excitement was keeping those former Army Air Corp. B 24's flying.  However, searching over North Africa for spare parts gave our crew lots of great liberty stops.

Relieved from duty in North Africa we returned to the States for additional training and new aircraft.  Squadron designation was changed to VPB-111 as we were assigned to the Pacific Fleet.  Our bases included: Hawaii, Tinian, Moritai, Leyte, Mindoro, Peleliu and Palawan.  Now a strike squadron, our targets were shipping and island installations, not A. S. W.

Our Crew was relieved from the squadron at the end of May 1945, I was returning home as a Chief Petty Officer and not yet twenty one years old.  Being on Tuttle’s crew we were the first to leave the States heading for England, now on Lt. Ashton’s Crew, we were the “last” to leave the Pacific from the original 111 squadron. Received my discharge where I started, Naval Training Station, San Diego, California, November, 1945.

First Assignment: Enjoy being home at Mom’s in Hollywood, and Beach Duty at  Santa Monica enjoying days with buddies soaking up the sun.

First Job: Contract actor at 20th Century Fox Studio. Did “stand in” for actors namely: Caesar Romero and Victor Mature. “Walk- ons” in several movies.  Finding  this all very unsuitable for me and boring at the time, this part of my life ended.

Marriage: A year after leaving the Navy, 1946,  I married Colleen, my first wife.  Moving to the San Fernando Valley, our son was born in July 1955. In 1963 Colleen passed away and left Kevin and I.  Grieving we and  moved to Australia.     After a year there and a brief time in Tahiti,    we came back to the U. S. San Fernando Valley our home.

Second Job: After the Movie Business, bought a “Flying A” Station on Melrose and Vine, Hollywood, Ca.  This was followed by over ten years with Anheuser Busch.  

After the loss of my Mother in 1950, and the birth of Kevin, changes brought me wanting more for my family.  A taste in the decorating business through a part ownership in a drapery                   manufacturing business I became interested and obtained my Real Estate Sales License in California.  In 1960 I became a Real Estate Broker and remained in the business until I retired in 1987.

Marriage: 1969, my lovely wife, Barbara and I were married on Valentine’s Day, giving Kevin and I a whole new family to love and be a part of.  After our first years in Costa Mesa/Newport Beach, Ca. Area, in 1973 we moved from Newport Beach, Ca. To Lake Tahoe. Due to health reasons we relocated and now live in a lovely foothill town of Placerville, Ca., in the Sierras. It does snow sometimes, but nothing like Lake Tahoe, and it is only fifty miles to the ski hill.
We traveled  from 1988 til 1997 across these beautiful United States, seeing all 48 contiguous and Hawaii. Making several trips, we visited Norfolk, Banana River Florida, and even Presque Isle, Maine, where the 111 had left for St. Eval, England.  During the traveling it was always important to return for snow fall in the Sierras and be ready for skiing.

Other Interests: Down Hill Skiing already a sport that I participated in, became a big part of my life. My  wife and I became members of the National Ski Patrol in 1947 and I remained active, serving until1987.
In 1958-1960, I was a member of the 1960 Winter Olympic Games as a Patrol Leader, and Avalanche Control Team, along with being selected Captain of the Honor Guard for/during Opening Ceremony held at Squaw Valley, Ca.

Motto: The Golden Rule. Family/ Friends/ Faith ....a blend and a balance in my life is what I have been fortunate to have throughout my days so far.  

Thanks to my Barbara and her discovery of the web site, first finding and contacting James Bell, and then regaining contact with my buddies/my friends of long ago the CAC 12, members of 111.  Being able to talk to PPC Ashton, Plane Captain, Sam Leonetti, Radioman, James Gibson, Radarman, Ed Trybala, Tail Gunner James Bell and Norwood Speary.  HOW GOOD IT IS!

Bud Mills                                                
30 June 2003 18:50:18
foko@d-web.com
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 Paul C. Madden

I WAS AN 'AMM3/C' WITH CASU-F-9., CHUCK KELLER 'AMM1/C' AND
H.L. LOUDERBACK-AMM3/C WERE MY SHIPMATES FROM HUTCHISON, KANSAS NAS. WE WERE
IN THE SECOND GROUP TO GO THROUGH B-24 (PB4Y1) TRAINING. THE FIRST CLASS
WENT TO ENGLAND AND WE WENT TO NAS SAN DIEGO, CA. AND THEN CAMP MUGU FOR
COMBAT TRAINING.

WE SHIPPED OUT ON A DUTCH TRANSPORT "USAT TABINTA" IT HAD
THE SECOND LARGEST DIESEL ENGINES IN THE WORLD AT THAT TIME, COULD DO OVER
30 KNOTS IF NEEDED. WE CROSSED THE PACIFIC UN-ESCORTED TO HOLLANDIA, NEW
GUINEA, THEN IN CONVOY TO LEYTE GULF. OUR SUPPLY ACORN UNIT WAS LOST AT SEA,
AND WE SET UP CAMP ON A LITTLE ISLAND IN THE GULF UNTIL THE 'CB'S AND ARMY
ENGINEERS BUILT THE METAL LANDING STRIP NEAR TACLOBAN. I DON'T REMEMBER THE
DESIGNATION OF THE FIRST GROUP OF PB4Y-1'S THAT CAME TO TACLOBAN IN
NOVEMBER,1944. I OPERATED A STERLING-WHITE CRANE TRUCK, AS WELL AS BEING A
PROP SPECIALIST ON AND OFF.

IN DECEMBER,44 A NOTICE WAS POSTED THAT SAID '
DUE TO TOO MANY 3RD CLASS AMM'S THE FOLLOWING MEN HAVE BEEN DE-RATED AS OF
THE DATE RATED AND PAY ACCOUNTS SETTLED AS SAME. I WAS ONE OF THE TWO
LISTED. ( BACK AT HUTCHISON THE BASE SKIPPER CAME TO ME PERSONALLY AND
THANKED ME FOR MY EFFORTS AT THE SCHOOL AND WAS PROMOTING ALL S1C 'S TO 3RD
CLASS AMM'S. HA! HA!.) THE DAY I WAS SCHEDULED TO TAKE THE 3RD CLASS TEST, I
WAS WORKING WITH THE CB'S WITH MY CRANE TRUCK SETTING UP A STAGE IN THE
SWAMP BEHIND THE CAMP FOR THE " HELLZA POPPIN " STAGE SHOW. THEY HAD TO MOVE
ME AROUND WITH A D-8 CAT AND I WAS LATE GETTING TO THE TEST, AND THE LT.
WOULD NOT LET ME TAKE IT BECAUSE THE OTHER GUYS WERE ALMOST FINISHED.

I WAS IN THE ADVANCE GROUP TO GO TO PALAWAN,TO GET THE BASE READY FOR
TRANSFER FROM LEYTE. SHORTLY AFTER WE STARTED OPERATING OUT OF PALAWAN
(PORTO-PRINCESSA), WE STARTED TO GET THE FIRST PB4Y-2,S THE PRIVATEER, WITH
THE SINGLE RUDDER, AND THE NEW RADIO-GUIDED BOMBS. I HAD BEEN GIVING THE
EXEC A LOT OF STATIC ABOUT THE SCREWING I GOT ON MY RATE AND I ENDED UP
DIGGING POST HOLES FOR QUONSET HUTS AND THEN KP.  I WROTE A LETTER TO CHIEF
OF STAFF U.S.NAVAL PERSONNEL, AND ASKED A FIRST CLASS YEOMAN FOR A CORRECT
ADDRESS SO IT WOULDN'T GO THROUGH THE CHAIN OF COMMAND. HE SAID HE WOULD DO
SOME CHECKING BECAUSE HE COULDN'T UNDERSTAND HOW THEY COULD DE-RATE ME AS
THEY DID. TWO DAYS LATER AS I WAS DIPPING WATER INTO CANTEEN CUPS IN THE CHOW LINE,
HE ASKED ME WHAT MY HOME ADDRESS WAS, AFTER I TOLD HIM, HE TOLD ME TO COME
TO THE PERSONNEL TENT WHEN I GOT OFF. HE HAD PAPERS READY FOR ME TO RETURN
TO THE STATES AND REPORT TO PHILADELPHIA NAVAL AIR STATION FOR HYDRAULIC
CATAPULT TRAINING AFTER A 30 DAY LEAVE.

AFTER REACHING THE CONTINENTAL U.S..
THE NEXT DAY I DREW MY PAY AND WAS HANDED PAPERS TO TRAVEL " BEST WAY" . I
HITCHED A RIDE TO SAMAR AND WAS GIVEN A BILLET AND GUYS TOLD ME I WOULD BE
STUCK THERE. AT 3AM A GUY WOKE ME AND ASKED IF I WAS PAUL MADDEN, WHEN I
SAID YES, HE SAID GET YOUR GEAR AND COME WITH ME. HE TOOK ME TO THE AIRSTRIP
AND PUT ME ON A RD-5A 4 ENGINE TRANSPORT. AFTER ONE FUELING STOP IN MID
PACIFIC I LANDED AT PEARL HARBOR. SINCE ONLY WOUNDED COULD FLY INTO THE
CONTINENTAL U.S. I HAD TO WAIT AT A BASE OVERLOOKING PINEAPPLE PLANTATIONS
FOR 5 DAYS BEFORE BOARDING AN AP TRANSPORT. AFTER GOING THROUGH A TYPHOON WE
CROSSED UNDER THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE AND I TOSSED MY LAST NICKEL OVERBOARD
FOR GOOD LUCK. AFTER INDOCTRINATION WE WERE ALLOWED TO GO INTO FRISCO
OVERNIGHT. THE FIRST THING I DID WAS GET A REAL BIG JUICY HAMBURGER WITH
LETTUCE, TOMATO AND ONION, AND A BIG CHOCOLATE MILKSHAKE, AND THEN GO TO A
MOVIE THEATER. I LEARNED LATER THAT MY BUDDIES FROM CASU-F9 HAD TRANSFERRED TO SAMAR TO
AWAIT TRANSFER TO THE STATES AND DIS-BANDED.

WHILE GOING THROUGH HYDRAULIC CATAPULT TRAINING FOR THE NEW CARRIER
CV-51- THE FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, I ENDED UP IN THE HOSPITAL AND AFTER
WEEKS OF TESTING WAS TREATED FOR AOMEBIC DYSENTERY, FROM TAKING TOO MANY
LONG BATHS IN THE SWAMPS ON LEYTE. I ENDED UP AT GREAT LAKES NAVAL TRAINING STATION WHERE
I HAD GONE THROUGH BOOT CAMP IN SEPT-OCT1943. I WENT TO SICK BAY FOR A STOMACH ACHE AND THE DR.
GAVE ME BLACK AND WHITE LAXATIVE AND SENT ME BACK TO THE BARRACKS, IN A
COUPLE MORE HOURS I WAS DOUBLED OVER IN PAIN AND THEY DIAGNOSED ME AS
ASTERITIS ACUTE AND SENT ME BY AMBULANCE TO THE MAIN SIDE HOSPITAL, THEY
DIAGNOSED ME AS A-TYPICAL PNUEMONIA, FINALLY AFTER 5 DOCTORS CHECKED ME
THEY RUSHED ME TO SURGERY FOR A RUPTURED APPENDIX , PERITONITIS HAD ALREADY
SET IN. SO I SPENT THE NEXT 6 WEEKS IN THE HOSPITAL WITH A DRAIN TUBE
STICKING OUT OF ME.

I FINALLY GOT DISCHARGED IN JUNE 1946, AND GOT TOGETHER
WITH H.L. LOUDER BACK IN ANDERSON INDIANA WHOM I HAD MET IN THE OGU AT
GREAT LAKES FOR ASSIGNMENT AFTER BOOT CAMP. HE WAS THE LAST "L" AND I WAS
THE FIRST "M" IN LINE. WE HAD GONE TOGETHER TO NAVY PIER IN CHICAGO, THEN
NORTH ISLAND, SAN DIEGO, THEN HUTCHISON,KANSAS , WE HITCHHIKED HOME FROM
HUTCHISON ON 15 DAYS DELAYED ORDERS BEFORE BACK TO THE "NO LONGER" NAVAL AIR
STATION, SAN DIEGO, THEN CAMP MUGU, PORT HUENEMA, LEYTE , MINDANAO, PALAWAN,
WHERE I SEPARATED FROM THE UNIT IN MAY,1945. WE BOTH MARRIED IN 1947 AND
REMAINED CLOSE FRIENDS UNTIL HIS SUDDEN DEATH IN 1976.

 HAVE NOT HEARD FROM CHUCK KELLER FOR SEVERAL YEARS, SINCE HIS WIFE DIED. MY FIRST WIFE AND
MOTHER OF MY SONS DAN AND JOHN, DIED IN 1972, I RE-MARRIED TO A FORMER
FRIEND'S EX FOR 4 YEARS OF HELL, AND DIVORCED, THEN MET MY DREAM WOMAN IN
1975 AT HER HUSBANDS FUNERAL. HER SISTER IS MARRIED TO MY BROTHER IN
CALIFORNIA AND I NEVER MET THIS LADY UNTIL MY SISTER-IN-LAW INVITED ME TO
THE FUNERAL OF HER BROTHER-IN-LAW. WE WERE MARRIED FOR 17 YEARS UNTIL SHE
PASSED AWAY IN 1992 FROM LUNG CANCER.

EVERY YEAR I WISH TO ATTEND THE REUNION, BUT EITHER I DIDN'T HAVE THE
MONEY, OR I WOULD CONVINCE MYSELF THAT I WOULD NOT KNOW A SINGLE
PERSON, BECAUSE WHEN I WAS IN THE PHILIPPINES THEY KEPT ME SO BUSY THAT I
NEVER REALLY GOT TO KNOW ANY OF THE FLIGHT CREWS PERSONALLY.

KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK, I LOOK FORWARD TO READING THE QUARTERLY
NEWSLETTER, EVEN THOUGH I DIDN'T PERSONALLY KNOW ANY OF YOU FLY BOYS.
IT SURE BRINGS BACK A LOT OF MEMORIES OF ALL THE GOOD AND A LOT OF
TRAGEDIES THAT HAPPENED.

YOURS IN COMRADSHIP,
PAUL C. MADDEN, AUGUST 2004
lemaddog@gmail.com
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 DAVID MESSER

I entered the Navy in November of 1957 right before Thanksgiving.  I was inducted at Kansas City and sent to San Diego for Boot Camp.  On to NATC in Norman, Oklahoma. After Norman I went to Millington, Tenn and had my first stint of mess duty.  I eventually made it to avionics training completing it (barely) at the end of 1958 (I never was a good “tweaty”).  

After leave, I left home in San Antonio on the train in the winter of '58 or early '59 for NAS Brunswick.  I boarded the train wearing a light jacket fitting for the 70 degree San Antonio weather.  I climbed off the train days later in Brunswick, Maine in the middle of the night at 20 below zero still wearing my light jacket.  At the time VP-21 was on deployment so I was assigned hanger deck duty under Leading Chief Dillashaw, an old WWII black shoe Boats who held little regard for airdales. I scrubbed heads and hanger decks daily until the squadron returned from deployment where I was promptly assigned mess duty again.  

Once in the squadron, I worked in the avionics shop for awhile, flew off and on, mostly on training assignments. I don't remember much about the beginning of my squadron duty.  I was with the group deployed to Keflavik, Iceland.  At Keflavik I roomed with Neal Stewart.  Neal and I figured out how to hop MATS I9 flights to Copenhagen, Madrid and Frankfurt.  It was great sport.   I was assigned to a flight crew and  believe the pilot was Lt. Cmdr. Trautman (I can't remember the LH number).  Once back in the states, I was assigned to a crew piloted by Cmdr Boniface, LH 9 , I believe.  Best as I recall, Bill Spaulding was on radio, Manfred Lenz and Steve Kenyon were in the aftstation and Anderson was on ECM.  I believe Ben Hacker was Navigator.  I stayed with this crew the rest of my tour.  I made AT3 in '59 and AT2 in '60.  In '61 I received my AC wings.  My best buddies were Tom Nicholson and Neal Stewart.  Other names that come to mind are: Jim Besse, Bill Scaggs, Mike Reardon, J.O. Thompson, Bergy Bergman, Lehrman, Otis “OBO” Owens, good guys all.  

My enlistment was extended because of the Berlin crisis (the Russians building the Berlin wall), and I was discharged in May of '62.  After leaving Maine I headed for Amarillo, Texas where my parents were then living.  After being in Brunswick for almost four years, I thought Amarillo was surely my purgatory for all the good times I had in the Navy. I went to work for Texaco loading transport trucks at its Amarillo refinery.  While working for Texaco, I attended West Texas State Univ. and earned a degree.  I left Texaco and went work for Gulf Oil Corp. I worked in marketing for several years and transferred to the production side of the oil business in the late 70s.  At the time Chevron bought Gulf Oil, I was Division Land Manager.  I retired from Chevron in June of 1999 as Division Land Manager.  

My wife, Doris, and I traveled extensively until 2004 when I received a call from a friend asking if I would be interested going back to Chevron on a self-employed consulting basis.  I've been there since. My wife and I make our home in Midland , Texas, and I have a daughter living in the Houston area.  Doris and I own property in the Texas hill country near the town of Llano.  We are developing our hill country property and plan to retire (again) there.
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            Michael R. Mays

     I was born in a U.S. Post Office building (great aunt was a rural post office mistress) in Rolla, Arkansas, Jan. 17, 1940. Attended kindergarten in a Japanese Concentration Camp near Lake Village, Arkansas in 1943. My father was the Agriculture Adviser for the relocated Japanese-Americans. He was drafted into the US Navy in 1944. Served in the Pacific.
 Started grade school in 1945 at Lono, Arkansas. Graduated from high school in Malvern, Arkansas in 1957. I drove a school bus my senior year (16 years old at the beginning of the school year). I had a rural route picked up and delivered grade school children to Lono elementary and high school kids at Malvern. I did pretty good. Only had three accidents over the school year. The school district couldn't convince anyone else to drive the bus. The only injury was a broken nose of a very beautiful girl. I visited her in 2002. Didn't affect her looks at all after 45 years.
I spent the summer of `57 digging ditches, baling hay, and picking boysenberries in Los Banos, CA. My Dad offered to send me to college and it took me about 30 minutes to pack and grab a bus back to Arkansas.  I attended Henderson State Teachers College (now Henderson State University) for two years. Tuition was $86 a semester. Discovered I had no long term goals. Figured I was wasting my family's money.(I was the first member of my family, either side, to attend college).

 I enlisted in the Navy in June of 1959. Took all those test and the Navy was going to send me to Naval Cadet School to be a pilot. Blew that one. I'm color blind, not much, had something to do with pastels. Attended ADJ school at NATTC, Memphis, TN.(After three months of mess cooking).
       Got orders to VP-21 in Brunswick. Arrived there several days before I had to check in so I got a room in the Bowden Hotel and explored Brunswick. Met a local gal in a restaurant. We ate, went to movie, and I attempted to learn Down Eastern speech.  I checked into the squadron and met Chief Watt. He reminded me of an English bulldog. He must have been having a bad day, or maybe it was normal orientation. He immediately had my utmost respect. Reminded me of my company commander in boot camp, Chief Coker (He had been a POW during WWII and was mean as a snake). That is another story.

 It only took two weeks for me to find out that Chief Watt had a heart as big as all outdoors. The first payday I did not get a paid.  I headed up to Disbursing to find out what the problem was. It seems that the local girl I had met was a very close friend of a sailor in one of the other squadron on base and he was on deployment. The head disbursing clerk was a friend of that particular sailor. Well, the disbursing clerk figured he was going to put the fear of God in me. He did a pretty good job and I still didn't have my pay. I went back to the squadron and told Chief Watt of my problem. He was HOT. I accompanied him back to Disbursing and talk about the fear of God, I believe Chief Watt originated that particular situation. I got paid and maintained my association with that girl until 1965.
Of course the Chief took an interest in me and assigned me to compartment cleaning for awhile with some guy named Sayre. Weird way to spell a name.
     I finally discovered that he was in the Power Plants shop in VP-21. Yeah, ADR1 Al Acker was my new boss. Sumps and strainer was my task in the Navy. I learned how to spit shine dishpans and how to properly safety wire under his instruction.  A couple of my A school buddies had been assigned to the squadron also. ADR1 Acker had his hand full with the three musketeers: Mike Mays, Bill Studebaker, and Buddy Stevens. Actually Buddy was the quiet type. We were getting into the swing of things. Buddy was from Norway, Maine and felt sorry for the poor fellow from Arkansas and invited me to go home with him on occasions. Bill had relatives in Portland and invited me along for visits. Bill introduced me to the fast life in Portland
      Buddy introduced me to the Norwegian steam bath ( thats where you run half naked thru two feet of snow to the bath house and pour water on some hot rocks) and a young lady. No names. She was going to become a nurse. She promised to write when I deployed.

Thank the Lord for deploying VP-21 to Sigonella, Sicily.  We stopped over in Port Lyautey, French Morocco. Bill & I got chased by a  Moroccan grass cutter wielding a machete for taking a picture of a very attractive Moroccan lady. We escaped by running into the PX.

We got to Sigonella and my feet swelled up. Something called cellulitis. I wrote that young lady from Norway, Maine about my condition and I haven't heard from or seen her since. Couldn't figure that one out. Must have been the old saw about a girl in every port. Oh, well I wasn't too good at the polka anyway.

 Bill and I couldn't wait to explore the new world of the Old World. Our first discovery was white wine. The first and last time I drank white wine. Then pizza, Italian style, from a big brick oven. Then the night spots. Catania was a big town. We wound up in Club LaGara. They had an outstanding male singer, Genio by name, there and somehow we got to meet him. Don't know why but he must have thought Bill and I were entertaining. Anyway he introduced us to a group of young people aspiring to become entertainers. Tall Tale Studebaker thought up this idea that we should pass ourselves off as American talent scouts. We did. That lasted about two days. We did make friends with some of the group. I was especially attracted to a young lady who attempted to imitate Elvis with a rendition of “You Ain't Nothing But A Hound Dog”. Her name was Carla Cosentino. I was offered an invitation by her older sister to meet the family.  That was my introduction to the local culture. Nice people, but they couldn't speak English and I stumbled thru the evening thumbing thru my Italian-English book. I was still partial to the younger of the two sisters. Got nothing but dagger eyes from the older sister. I couldn't explain why I didn't drink wine without projecting a bad picture. They served me beer with the many meals that I had with them. Funny thing, I was never alone with Carla. I was invited to many family outings on the weekends. They toured the whole island. Wrote to her awhile after the deployment. Still have a picture of the family.

 Bill fell into a friendship with an Italian nobleman. I'll let Bill tell you about some of the outings we had at a villa near the Ilse of Cyclops.
     I was still a grunt in the Power Plants shop in Sigonella. 30, 60, 120, 240 hour checks in the hanger. Yeah, I was still pulling sumps & strainers.  That got me into a situation where I darn near killed a flight crew. I was assigned to help with a 120 hr. inspection in the hangar. A big ARD2 by the name of Tony Lanzarotta shook my leg and wanted to know when I was going to be through with the sump tools. Can't remember what I said but he TOLD me to go pull the strainer from the port engine of  his bird, I believe it was LH-8. I dragged a ladder and the sump tools out and removed the dishpan and popped the strainers on the port engine. Laid the strainer in the assy section. Took the bucket of oil, ladder and the sump tools back to the hangar. Nothing was said about breaking the strainer down and cleaning them or reinstalling.  I happened to be outside the hangar when the plane took off.  White smoke was trailing from the port engine and the engine went into feather. Oh Lord.  I high tailed it straight to the Maintenance Office and told the tale to Harry Dunlap, our Maintenance Officer. He turned kind of pale, then shook his head and walked back out to the line. I knew Tony was going to KILL me. As it turned out Mr. Dunlap having heard my side of the situation chewed Tony out for not pulling a proper preflight. Seem like he slapped the dishpan back over the assy section without inspecting the airman work.  ADR1 Zubiate, the plane captain, didn't want me working on his plane the rest of the deployment.
And the second most important event was Mt. Etna erupted while we were at Sigonella. We lost PN2 Brooks during the deployment.  
     I made ADJ3 on return to Brunswick. Chief Watt still liked me and made me barracks chief for the upcoming ADMAT. The barracks Officer, Ltjg Hungerford, Chief Watt, and AD3 Mays got a very favorable writeup on page 45 of the ADMAT summary, 1961. I still have that page. First good thing attributed to me in VP-21.
 Somehow I got back to the Power Plants shop. Must have done something good because ADR1 Stewart Hampton, plane captain on LH-1 asked me if I wand to be his 2nd Mech. Hey, that was $65 more a month in my pocket. I won't go into the Arctic Overland Survival course. That is another story also.  Remember, in Boot Camp on my second physical exam, why I didn't become a pilot. That never occurred to me when I was offered a 2nd Mechanic slot. I took the flight physical but the Ophthalmologist was on leave. It was three months after I started flying on LH-1 that I finally got checked for vision. I must of have done something good during that time because Cmdr Mackey submitted a request for wavier for me to fly.  I think Hampton didn't want to waste all the time and frustration he had expended training me. I'm here to tell you he was a taskmaster. I may be strrreeetching this a bit but my color blindness help pinpoint a lost Portuguese fisherman's boat on a short deployment we made to Argentia, New Foundland.  Bruno Tyborski was there when I thought I saw a white sail under the water. Ski and I smoked it. The crew at the time was: Cmdr. Mackey, Ltjg Hungerford, AT1 “Bull” Durham, AT1 Allen, AO2 “Ike” Isenberg, ATC Holmscheck, ADR1 Hampton, AMS2 Tiborski, ADJ3 Mays and some more crew. Check with the Historian on this. I may be fantasizing  in my old age.
 I have Stewart Hampton to thank for the work ethic I developed that carried me through the next 26 years of military service. A very unique individual. He literally took me under his wing, into his home and family, and regularly humiliated me while playing checkers and then salved the wounds by applying the defeat to the things that would be slapping me in the face the rest of my life. I still call him on occasions. He still lives on Hennessey Ave. in Brunswick. Margie, his wife passed away about seven years ago. She was a very good woman.
     Moving on.

 There must have been a dire shortage of plane captains in the squadron in 1961 because I was assigned to LH-2 as Plane captain. I had sewed on 2nd class strips during this period  Lt. Bill Betts & Ltjg Charles Brune were the flightdeck officers. ATC John Holmscheck, AT2 Lennard Nadeau, and AT3 J.T. Cobb, AMS2 Bill Kearney, ADJ2 Carl Agen, AO2 Jerry Folts, & AE2 Sloat rounded out the crew..

 I knew nothing about the traditional first flight of a new plane captain. One of the things that Stew Hampton forgot in my training.  I was very nervous, as most people are, when I suddenly realized that I was responsible for everything mechanical that can happen on the plane. First, I left the yellow sheet on the nose wheel, I need that to write up a major gripe discovered on take off. The whole darn crew was screwy, from the PPC down. A conspiracy was in the making way before I got on the plane. Lt. “Wild Bill” Betts had unlatched his overhead hatch and we are going 120 knots down the runway and the darn thing pops open to the first indention of the brace. I had never heard the likes of the  roar that was created. Don't asked me exactly what I did. I know my lower jaw bounced off the flight deck. This was not a situation covered in any of the training material that had been presented to me. I had to wing it. Lt. Betts looked back at me and asked “What's going on Mays?” I replied “I'm not sure”. He says “Well, get that hatch closed and figure it out when you can hear yourself think”. I did notice a grin on his face after the last question but that didn't register until about 30 minutes after I got the hatch closed.   I grabbed the hatch and moved the hatch latch out of the first indentation. The hatch further extended and stabilized in the air flow natural to design of the fuselage. My terror level was at its height.  Mr. Betts suggested I get a tie down rope and use it to secure the hatch. Agen was behind me with a grin on his face. I finally got the hatch secured with a little help from everyone on the flight deck. Yeah, I finally figured out it was a set up. The rest of the flight was normal.
  I could go on: the time that four crew members almost had their flight status revoked due to alleged criminal activities, that's another story. Or when I couldn't find a squadron member after the vehicle he was driving collided with a house. I left the squadron the middle of June, 1962. Went to VP-30 for 13 months. Worked for ADR1 Dick Gray in the Power Plants shop. Got transferred out to VP-49 in Pax River after 13 months. That's another story.  Worked the shop for a while and started to Flight Engineers School, P3C.

Got yanked out and drafted into Nuclear Power School (academics) in Bainbridge, MD. Then to West Milton Nuclear InHull Surface Site, near Saratoga Springs, NY. Transferred to USS Enterprise CVA 65, June 1965, home ported in Norfolk. Medically reverted from MMN2 to ADJ2. Worked in V-6 Division repairing every thing from air conditioning units to diesel engines. Became a Golden Shellback after a tour off Vietnam.  The `Big E' changed home ports to Alameda NAS, CA. Met the woman I was to make my 1st wife. Got orders to Quonset PT. NAS sometime in 1966. Married my first wife. Worked in Power Plants there. Ran into ADR2 John Pater, VP-21 person, & Lt Betts,(my old PPC) then in VR-6. Went to data analysts school and was transferred to VA-195, Lemoore NAS, Hanford, CA. Made PO1. in October, 1967. Divorced my 1st wife. Went on leave en route to visit parents in Arkansas. Severed the bone in the three outboard toes of my left foot with an axe (helping my dad clear land). Delayed transfer en route for 2 months. VA-195 was then aboard the USS Oriskany. I caught up with them in Subic Bay, P.I.  Left foot didn't heal properly walking on steel decks. Checked into Cubi Point hospital after one line period. Had my injured toe bone re-broken and reset, tendons spliced and re-attached to toes. Went back to VA-195 for 5 more line periods off Vietnam. Returned to Lemoore NAS. Met and married a woman in 1969. Made another South East Asia tour with VA-195 in 1969. Had a line number for chief during tour. Second wife threatened divorce. We were married for 6 weeks before the SE Asia tour.  End of Navy career Nov., 1969. 10 years 6 months.


 Worked for Pacific Gas & Electric, San Mateo, CA. For 2 ½ years, Electrical Overhead & Underground Estimator.
        Entered the USAF in  Oct.,72. SSgt. (E-5). Went to Carpenter A school for three weeks. Should have been a full 12 weeks. Transferred to Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas Nov., 1972. I was there for 3 months and was made shop chief. Darn lucky I had a good crew. They kept me out of trouble most of the time.   
Transferred to 554 Heavy Construction Squadron, U Taepao Air Base, Thailand in Sept.,1973. Tore down bases in NKP, Korat, & Ubon. Packed buildings for shipment to Clark Air Base, P.I.  In-squadron transfer to Clark Air Base in Jan.,1975. Escorted 3 Vietnamese orphans to California in 1976 and went on home to Arkansas and divorced my 2nd wife. She had sold our house and my dog. Lost my faith in women.
Did some good work in the Philippines. All those steel building we had disassembled in Thailand were scheduled into construction projects in the PI. I was Project Chief in re-assembling 6 buildings. Crowning achievement was the construction of a Satellite Communication Station from a chunk of land and a set of blueprints. It was  used for triangulation of the Moon shot in 1966. There were two more somewhere in the world. Had 6 months to complete it. I had a crew of 36 G.I.'s and Filipino civilians working for me and we completed the task in 4 ½ months. I received a Meritorious Service Metal for that. I weighed 130 lbs. when we finished that job. Usually a tour in a Red Horse squadron was only for 1 year, I extended twice for a total of three years. Liked the job. Very satisfying.
Met and married my 3rd wife in June 1977. Yeah, I'm still married to her. Transferred to Malmstrom Air Force Base, Great Falls, MT. In Jan., 1978. Made TSgt (E-6). Shop chief of the carpenter shop.

 Our 1st child, a girl, was born Aug., 1978. I made MSgt (E-7) in 1981. Our 2nd child, a girl, was born June 1981. Got orders to Kadena AB, Okinawa in Dec. 82. Shop Chief of Scheduled Maintenance and Repair.  Made a trip back to the States to deliver one of my crew to prison at Ft. Lewis, Washington. Became shop chief of   Metal Fabrications and Structural Superintendent. Served a stint as First Shirt (Leading Chief) shades of Chief Watt . I found out the reason for that scowl he carried around at times.
     Ordered back to Malmstrom AFB, Montana. Made SMSgt (E-8)    I became Superintendent in a Minuteman II missile squadron.  Had my heart attack in 1989 and put in my papers for retirement. Retired in May, 1990.

After retirement, I held odd jobs around town for two years. Yeah, minimum wage. I didn't want to be boss anymore. But my back gave out. I'm 80% disabled. Anyway I returned to college in the Fall of 1992 and graduated in May 1996 with a degree in computer sciences, Informational Systems. Entry level at 56 years of age was not a given. I tried to get a job here in Montana for two years and gave up. No one wanted to hire a 56 year old at an entry level. I officially became Mr. Mom in our household. I build computers and do volunteer work at the Senior Citizen's Center and AARP.

Our children, Patricia, the elder, is 27 now. Patricia graduated high school as 5th in a class of 389. Graduated from Montana State University in 2000 and is a microbiologist working in Bozeman, MT. Ida, 24, graduated 15th in her high school class in 1999, graduated from the University of Montana in 2003 with a degree in Human Biology. She is currently in college again at Montana State to become a nurse. Recessive genes. Both girls are married. My wife Gay is a Filipina, 53 years of age, 25 years with me,  and loves the weather here in Montana and out fishes me constantly. She retired about a year ago.

 I suppose it is the advanced years, but I yearn to see my old friends from VP-21. The wife and I were planning to make the reunion in Pensacola 2003. Unfortunately I started having breathing problems in October.  I was diagnosed with lung cancer, right lung in Nov., 03. My wife was diagnosed with breast cancer two weeks before I was diagnosed. Gay had her left breast removed in late November and went into chemotherapy. I went into chemo and radiation treatments for a period of two months. The cancer shrank and I had a partial lung removal on April 2, 2004. We were both in remission for two years. I returned to Chemo treatment for four months after my physical recovery from surgery. We made the `05 Reunion and had a very good  time enjoying the East and Gulf Coast before the hurricanes hit. Gay caught a 10 lb Red Fish . That was the highlight while we visit close relatives in New Orleans. I had visited several times over the years. We gave her a good Cajun and seafood feed for 4 days.

We continued  the good life in Montana. That means catching as many walleye as the  law allows.  We slipped into winter. I started  getting the blahs, or so  I thought. I had been making my  6 week and 12 week appointments. I had been  doing taxes  for low and middle class people. I started running out of gas. We increased  appointments. And  went through all the x-rays again. My pulmonary doctor isn't  noted for  his bedside manner. Unfortunately,  Gay was with me while he stood there and said  “ You have become terminally ill.” I remained upright. I asked what my options were, and he said “Chemo or no chemo, no other.”  I consider myself a very strong person and will elect the method that will give the most time with my family.  Here's a kick in the butt: my eldest daughter told  me that she will be having a baby in December.  One of the daughters will keep Dale Woods in the loop as to the exact  time of my passing.  I got hit with Agent Orange the next to the last day I was in DaNang. I was on my way home.  Don't know why it hid so long.
I'm going to live a long as I can.
A little advice……Love your real friends, patch up old feuds.. Make that last  flair a squeaker.
          See  you on the other side.
Sincerely:
Mike  Mays
May, 2006

Webmaster's (Frank Balogh Jr., deceased) note: "May God bless you Mike. We'll see each other again someday at that final reunion. Keep 'er trimmed and level, and keep the beer cold"

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Charles D. Mott  7/30/04

Captain Charles D. Mott, USN (Ret) was the CO of VP-21 from 21 June 1948 through October 1949.
He passed away on July 30,2004. He was hospitalized at Walter Reed for a
blood infection, and was regaining his strength when he suffered a massive
stroke. He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery on September 20, 2004
with full military honors.

Ref: Joseph W. H. Mott of Roanoke, VA., son.

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Joseph J. McHale

"Joseph J. McHale (CPO USN RET) went to be with the Lord on Tuesday November 15, 2011 at the Lower Cape Fear Hospice & LifeCareCenter.

His death was due to a head injury sustained by a fall. Joseph was born on May 18, 1924 in West Pittston Pa. He is preceded in death by his son Mark, sister Mary Elizabeth Paye and niece Megan Paye.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife Cynthia, son Michael, daughters Mary Eileen and Maura and nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren, several nieces and nephews and his precious beagle, Dolly.

Joe served 20 years in the US Navy. He also retired in 1984 from Perkin Elmer Corporation in Norwalk CT. After moving to Wilmington in 1986, he drove a school bus for New Hanover County Schools and taught math courses at Cape Fear Tech."

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Alexander H. Mackenzie

Alexander H. MacKenzie, 74, of Lisbon, Maine died Jan. 25, of pancreatic cancer at Hospice House, with his loving family by his side.  He was born July 21, 1938, in Boston, Mass.  Mac graduated from Billerica High School in Boston. He then served his country proudly in the U.S. Navy from 1955 to 1975, where he was stationed  in Brunswick and was a Survival School Instructor in Rangeley. After the military, he then went on to work as a bowling center manager at Holiday Lanes for 15 years. Then he worked for Papa John¹s in Ohio, as a managing maintenance mechanic for 15 stores, before retiring in 1998.  Mac was also a member of the Holy Family Church.  He enjoyed horseshoes, fishing, cooking, camping, watching the Red Sox and Patriots and especially enjoyed being with his family.

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Theodore A. Megee

Theodore "Skippy" Arnold Megee Sr., 81, of Colonial Beach passed away Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, at home. Skippy was born Jan. 10, 1932, to the late Henry Edward Megee and the late Myrtle Clifford Wilkerson Megee.

He served in the U.S. Navy and was self-employed as a master electrician with the U.S. government at his retirement.

Survivors include his wife, Betty Jean Megee of the home; sons Theodore Megee Jr. of Lorton, David Aubrey Megee of Arlington, James Edward Megee of Bealeton and Thomas Gordon Megee of Cocoa, Fla.; daughters Patricia Megee Hopkins of Fredericksburg and Susan Eileen Megee of Cocoa; and sister Georgeanna Bayse of Alexandria. He was blessed with 12 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his brothers, George and Billy; and sisters Dorothy, Lucy and Patty.

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Walter Martell

Walter Martell Obituary

Walter Martell 90, died peacefully at home in Oro Valley, AZ on May 30, 2015. Born Veikko Marttila in Virginia, MN to Finnish immigrants Arvo and Martha (Kankaanpaa), Walter served in the Naval Air Service as a radio operator and gunner during WWII where he saw combat in the South Pacific. While at the University of Minnesota, he met and married Barbara (Werner), his wife of 63 years who passed away in 2014. Walter had a career in radio broadcasting and retired as General Manager of station KWKY in Des Moines. Barb and Walt settled in Oro Valley in 1987 where he pursued his life-long love of flying until age 80. Funny, intelligent and kind, Walt was a grateful member of Alcoholics Anonymous, sober more than 47 years. Walter and Barbara are survived by three children, Martha, Eric (Maria Victoria) and David (Elena Secota) and five grandchildren, Keith, Alexander, Salena, Miranda and Wyatt. No services are planned. Arrangements by ADAIR FUNERAL HOMES, Avalon Chapel.



 

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Robert P. McKeown

Robert Park "Bob" McKeown, 89, of Hendersonville, North Carolina, died July 14, 2016 following a lengthy illness. Bob was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania on January 12, 1927, the son of the late Elda Park McKeown and Guy Harris McKeown. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his only sibling, James McKeown.
Bob married Dorothy Joan "Dottie" Shupp on September 19, 1953. She preceded him in death in 2015. Bob spent nearly his entire professional career with Union Carbide Corporation where he held several accounting and financial positions. Bob, Dottie and family lived at various times in Cleveland, Ohio; Greenville, North Carolina; Asheboro, North Carolina; St. Albans, Vermont; Rogers, Arkansas; West Milford, New Jersey; South Windsor, Connecticut, and Hendersonville, North Carolina where they retired to in 1986. Bob and Dottie were members of First United Methodist Church of Hendersonville.

Bob grew up in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania where he graduated from high school in 1945. He also spent many summers at the Park family farm in Fannettsburg, Pennsylvania. It was there that he developed a passion for hunting and fishing, pastimes that he enjoyed throughout his life. After his retirement, Bob penned a personal memoir entitled My Life As I Remember It, much of which centered on life on a subsistence farm during the Great Depression.
He served in the U.S. Navy as a member of the VP-21 Navy Air Crew. He attended Washington and Jefferson University in Pennsylvania and graduated from Bowling Green University.

Bob was a humble, unassuming man who instilled in his children the values of hard work, self-discipline and love of family, virtues he modeled throughout his life.

Bob pursued a number of hobbies during his life. He was an accomplished gunsmith, a stamp collector and a coin collector. He also enjoyed fly fishing, deer hunting, camping, hiking, canoeing and travel to the Caribbean. Following retirement, he also caned chairs for many in western North Carolina. Bob also kept books for the Blue Ridge Radio Players and the Long John Mountain Homeowners' Association in Hendersonville.
As his children were growing up, Bob was at various times a youth baseball coach and PTA volunteer. He was also active in various churches he attended, most often as an usher.

Bob is survived by his daughter, Pat (Kurt) Kopp of Columbia, Missouri; and three sons, Bill (Candy) McKeown of Littleton, Colorado; Richard (Tracye) McKeown of Bryant, Arkansas; and John (Linda) McKeown of Centreville, Virginia. Also surviving him are eight grandchildren, Michael Kopp; Eric Kopp; Anne Kimberling; Sarah Kopper; Kristen McCrary; Courtney Jones; Jenna McKeown, and Anna McKeown. He also leaves 10 great-grandchildren, Lucas Kopp, Tobin Kopp, Marlon Kopp, Greta Kopp, Evan McCrary, Ella McCrary, Cash McCrary, Harvey Kopper, Eileen Kopper and Edie Jones.

The family wishes to express its heartfelt gratitude to the caregivers at the Carolina Medical Center and Pardee Hospital for their kind compassion and excellent care they provided Bob in his final weeks and months.  A graveside memorial service will be held at the Lower Path Valley Cemetery in Fannettsburg, Pennsylvania. Memorials may be made to the Foundation Fighting Blindness, 7168 Columbia Gateway Drive, Suite 100, Columbia, MD 21046.

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Merlyn D. Muntz

 

Merlyn D. Muntz, 84, a lifelong funeral director in David City, Neb., died Sunday (4/25/10) at the Veterans Home in Minneapolis, Minn. Born in Sheridan Lake, Colo. to Carl L. and Viola(Kindler) Muntz, Sr. Enlisted in the United States Navy and served during WWII in the Pacific Theater. Married Rose Ramona Knott in David City.

 

Survived by: wife, Rose Ramona Knott Muntz, David City; sons, John Carl Muntz, Andover, Md., Ronald Wayne Muntz, San Antonio, Texas, Steven Merle Muntz, Chadds Ford, Penn; five grandchildren; four great grandchildren.

 

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Joseph F. Mueller

Joseph Francis MUELLER Obituary

Joseph Mueller, August 17, 2018 Passed away peacefully at age 82 of health complications. Born in St. Paul on November 11, 1935 and moved to Vadnais Heights in 1963. Married to Charlotte (Charley) for 57 years and raised three boys Dale, Dean and Chad. Preceded in death by his brothers Roger and Harry and parents August and Neva. Survived by Jim, August, Jr., and Rita Woods. Served with his brother Jim in the Navy. Very committed to charity work in Vadnais Heights through the Lions Club, Food Shelf and Toys for Tots and a charter member of the Vadnais Heights Fire Department. An avid card player, long time booya maker, he will be greatly missed by his many friends and family. Celebration of life at the American Legion, 1129 Arcade Street, St. Paul, MN Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at 5:00 p.m.

Published in Pioneer Press on Aug. 19, 2018

 

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